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Inventing equal opportunity / Frank Dobbin.

By: Dobbin, Frank.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, [2009]Copyright date: ©2009Description: x, 310 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780691137438 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0691137439 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780691149950 (pbk.); 069114995X (pbk.).Subject(s): Discrimination in employment -- United States | Affirmative action programs -- United States | Diversity in the workplace -- United States | Sexual harassment of women -- United States | Civil rights -- United States | Personnel management -- United StatesDDC classification: 331.13/30973 Other classification: PQ 9000 | QV 220
Contents:
Regulating discrimination: the paradox of a weak state -- Washington outlaws discrimination with a broad brush -- The end of Jim Crow: the personnel arsenal put to new purposes -- Washington means business: personnel experts fashion a system of compliance -- Fighting bias with bureaucracy -- The Reagan revolution and the rise of diversity management -- The feminization of HR and work-family programs -- Sexual harassment as employment discrimination -- How personnel defined equal opportunity.
Summary: The author demonstrates how corporate personnel experts, not Congress or the courts, determined what equal opportunity meant in practice, designing changes in how employers hire, promote, and fire workers, and ultimately defining what discrimination is, and is not. He shows how Congress and the courts merely endorsed programs devised by corporate personnel.--[book jacket].
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD4903.5 .U58 D63 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002025880
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HD4901 .M15 2006 Contemporary labor economics / HD4901 .M15 2010 Contemporary labor economics / HD4903.5 .U58 B4 1971 The economics of discrimination HD4903.5 .U58 D63 2009 Inventing equal opportunity / HD4903.5.U58 M3 The Manager's guide to equal employment opportunity / HD4903.5 .U58 M33 2006 Freedom is not enough : HD4903.5.U58 P73 1971 Discrimination in labor markets,

The author demonstrates how corporate personnel experts, not Congress or the courts, determined what equal opportunity meant in practice, designing changes in how employers hire, promote, and fire workers, and ultimately defining what discrimination is, and is not. He shows how Congress and the courts merely endorsed programs devised by corporate personnel.--[book jacket].

Regulating discrimination: the paradox of a weak state -- Washington outlaws discrimination with a broad brush -- The end of Jim Crow: the personnel arsenal put to new purposes -- Washington means business: personnel experts fashion a system of compliance -- Fighting bias with bureaucracy -- The Reagan revolution and the rise of diversity management -- The feminization of HR and work-family programs -- Sexual harassment as employment discrimination -- How personnel defined equal opportunity.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor made clear that race remains a volatile, contentious issue in the US. Likewise, those hearings propagated the idea that "law" is some brooding, objective omnipresence accessible to suitably qualified judges. In this superb book, Dobbin (sociology, Harvard) explains the process through which white males have now become "victims" of a system intended to uplift disadvantaged groups; at the same time, it reveals the fallacy of judicial neutrality in civil rights cases. Dobbin's thesis is that the apparatus of affirmative action was constructed in important part by personnel specialists operating in an environment of uncertain legal principles. The book's opening chapter analyzes the "paradox of a weak state," where power is dispersed among different levels of government and legal authority. State and federal legislatures, along with judges and administrative officials, contributed to a decentralized regime in which legal consciousness evolved simultaneously with social movements. Subsequent chapters trace the influence over the past four decades of personnel experts who stepped in to define and institutionalize an employment bureaucracy aimed at creating equal workplace opportunity. Overall, Dobbin tells a clear, well-documented, fascinating story about workplace relations. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. R. L. Hogler Colorado State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank Dobbin is professor of sociology at Harvard University. His books include Forging Industrial Policy: The United States, Britain , and France in the Railway Age; The New Economic Sociology: A Reader (Princeton); and The Global Diffusion of Markets and Democracy .

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