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The fiery trial : Abraham Lincoln and American slavery / Eric Foner.

By: Foner, Eric, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : W. W. Norton and Company, [2010]Copyright date: copyright 2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxi, 426 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780393066180; 0393066185.Subject(s): Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Views on slavery | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United StatesDDC classification: 973.7092 LOC classification: E457.2 | .F66 2010
Contents:
"I am naturally anti-slavery" : young Abraham Lincoln and slavery -- "Always a Whig" : Lincoln, the law, and the second party system -- monstrous injustice" : becoming a republican -- house divided" : slavery and race in the late 1850s -- only substantial difference" : secession and Civil War -- "I must have Kentucky" : the border strategy -- "Forever free" : the coming of emancipation -- new birth of freedom" : securing emancipation -- fitting, and necessary conclusion" : abolition, reelection, and the challenge of reconstruction -- "Every drop of blood" : the meaning of the war.
Awards: Bancroft Prize, 2011. | Pulitzer Prize for history, 2011Summary: In a landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Foner gives us a life of Lincoln as it intertwined with slavery, the defining issue of the time and the tragic hallmark of American history. The author demonstrates how Lincoln navigated a dynamic political landscape deftly, moving in measured steps, often on a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party, and that Lincoln's greatness lay in his capacity for moral and political growth.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E457.2 .F66 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002031151

Includes chronology of Lincoln, slavery, and emancipation (p. 339-345) and bibliographical references (p. 349-406) and index.

"I am naturally anti-slavery" : young Abraham Lincoln and slavery -- "Always a Whig" : Lincoln, the law, and the second party system -- "The monstrous injustice" : becoming a republican -- "A house divided" : slavery and race in the late 1850s -- "The only substantial difference" : secession and Civil War -- "I must have Kentucky" : the border strategy -- "Forever free" : the coming of emancipation -- "A new birth of freedom" : securing emancipation -- "A fitting, and necessary conclusion" : abolition, reelection, and the challenge of reconstruction -- Epilogue : "Every drop of blood" : the meaning of the war.

In a landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Foner gives us a life of Lincoln as it intertwined with slavery, the defining issue of the time and the tragic hallmark of American history. The author demonstrates how Lincoln navigated a dynamic political landscape deftly, moving in measured steps, often on a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party, and that Lincoln's greatness lay in his capacity for moral and political growth.

Bancroft Prize, 2011.

Pulitzer Prize for history, 2011

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Foner's nuanced account contends that Lincoln unwaveringly opposed slavery throughout his life and moved in a consistent, calculated antislavery direction during his presidency. Race emerged as a focal point when it became necessary to convey how enlisting African Americans was vital to saving the Union. (LJ 8/10) (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

As a historical subject, Abraham Lincoln has attracted thousands of books and articles; just the books on his Emancipation Proclamation alone would fill many a library shelf, yet more books on Lincoln appear every year. Foner (Columbia) adds his own interpretation of Lincoln's political career, with an especially careful look at the process of abolishing slavery. Instead of a modern interpretation of Lincoln's actions, Foner places the emancipation discussion in the context of contemporary politics, with Lincoln as only one of a number of players in the debate. Foner describes the various implications and nuances of freeing the slaves, including the contentious issues of colonization, African American military service, and the future rights of former slaves in the war's aftermath. The pace of the adeptly written book does not exceed the vast amount of information presented, leaving readers with a complete yet understandable narrative of momentous historical events. The result is a highly readable and comprehensive view with some information that advanced readers might already know, but that is presented in a different viewpoint. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. J. Ramold Eastern Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eric Foner is the preeminent historian of his generation. His books have won the top awards in the profession, and he has been president of both major history organizations, the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians. He is the author of Give Me Liberty!, which displays all of his trademark strengths as a scholar, teacher, and writer. A specialist on the Civil War/Reconstruction period, he regularly teaches the nineteenth-century survey at Columbia University, where he is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History. In 2011, Foner's The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery won the Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize, and the Lincoln Prize. His Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad is a 2015 New York Times bestseller. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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