Imperial leather : race, gender and sexuality in the colonial contest / Anne McClintock.

By: McClintock, Anne, 1954-Contributor(s): American Council of Learned SocietiesMaterial type: TextTextSeries: ACLS Humanities E-BookPublisher: New York : Routledge, 1995Description: xi, 449 p. : ill., map ; 24 cmISBN: 0415908892 (alk. paper); 9780415908894 (alk. paper); 0415908906 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780415908900 (pbk. : alk. paper)Subject(s): Man-woman relationships -- Colonies -- Great Britain -- History | Sex role -- Colonies -- Great Britain -- History | Sex -- Colonies -- Great Britain -- History | Great Britain -- Colonies -- History -- 19th century | Great Britain -- Colonies -- History -- 20th century | Great Britain -- Colonies -- Race relations | Commonwealth countries -- HistoryLOC classification: DA16Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Postcolonialism and the Angel of Progress -- Empire of the Home -- The Lay of the Land: Genealogies of Imperialism -- "Massa" and Maids: Power and Desire in the Imperial Metropolis -- Imperial Leather: Race, Cross-dressing and the Cult of Domesticity -- Psychoanalysis, Race and Female Fetishism -- Double Crossings -- Soft-Soaping Empire: Commodity Racism and Imperial Advertising -- The White Family of Man: Colonial Discourse and the Reinvention of Patriarchy -- Oliver Schreiner: The Limits of Colonial Feminism -- Dismantling the Master's House -- The Scandal of Hybridity: Black Women's Resistance and Narrative Ambiguity -- "Azikwelwa" (We Will Not Ride): Cultural Resistance in the Desperate Decades -- No Longer in a Future Heaven: Nationalism, Gender and Race. Postscript: The Angel of Progress.
In: History e-book project In: Humanities e-book
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DA16 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://hdl.handle.net/2027/heb.02146 Available heb.02146

Includes bibliographical references (p. [397]-433) and index.

Introduction: Postcolonialism and the Angel of Progress -- 1. Empire of the Home -- 1. The Lay of the Land: Genealogies of Imperialism -- 2. "Massa" and Maids: Power and Desire in the Imperial Metropolis -- 3. Imperial Leather: Race, Cross-dressing and the Cult of Domesticity -- 4. Psychoanalysis, Race and Female Fetishism -- 2. Double Crossings -- 5. Soft-Soaping Empire: Commodity Racism and Imperial Advertising -- 6. The White Family of Man: Colonial Discourse and the Reinvention of Patriarchy -- 7. Oliver Schreiner: The Limits of Colonial Feminism -- 3. Dismantling the Master's House -- 8. The Scandal of Hybridity: Black Women's Resistance and Narrative Ambiguity -- 9. "Azikwelwa" (We Will Not Ride): Cultural Resistance in the Desperate Decades -- 10. No Longer in a Future Heaven: Nationalism, Gender and Race. Postscript: The Angel of Progress.

Electronic text and image data. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University of Michigan, Scholarly Pub. Office, 2004. includes both TIFF files and keyword searchable text. ([History e-book project]) Mode of access: Intranet. This volume is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

McClintock (English, Columbia Univ.) interprets 19th-century British imperialism as the focal point for that era's major "disclosures," including feminism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis. She describes Victorian urban space‘including advertising‘as being oriented to exhibit imperial spectacle based on racism and sexism. In turn, the colonies become stages for exhibiting a reinvented patriarchy, with Westerners symbolizing power and indigenous peoples a subdued domesticity. The text is an exercise in demonstrating preconceptions. While some of McClintock's evidence is original, the argument as a whole is conventional bien-pensant wisdom unlikely to convince anyone not already committed to the thesis. The presentation is further burdened by its reliance on the clichés and jargon of feminism, deconstructionism, and other currently fashionable academic ideologies. Imperialism was at once a simpler and a more complex phenomenon than McClintock's perspective allows. For large academic collections only.‘D.E. Showalter, Colorado Coll., Colorado Springs (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

McClintock's magisterial study--"a sustained quarrel with the project of imperialism, the cult of domesticity, and the invention of industrial progress"--is a daring articulation of the race-class-gender triad. The axis of British Victorian metropolis/(South) African colony provides her spatial and temporal organizing principles. Within these constraints McClintock (Columbia Univ.) shows that "the cult of domesticity," usually seen as a cultural production of industrial capitalism at "home," involved an erasure of women's labor everywhere--which made domesticity "an indispensable element both of the industrial market and the imperial enterprise." A bold redefinition of "fetishism" challenges and enlarges Freudian and Marxist paradigms, and allows the author to move freely across the elaborate text of empire (including an astonishing range of visual images) from Olive Schreiner to H. Rider Haggard's King Solomon's Mines to the photo archive and diaries of Arthur Munby and, more importantly, the diaries of his wife-servant (The Diaries of Hannah Cullwick, Victorian Maidservant, CH, Jun'85). Such encyclopedism is impelled by a moral urgency to uncover both how power uses culture to control and how the disempowered use culture to resist. At the end McClintock asks that (male) postcolonial criticism mind both "the gendered dynamics of the subject" and the need for alternative historical narratives that resist the power of the "progress" myth. Rich, learned notes with full citations; well-integrated and indexed illustrations and text. Upper-division undergraduates; graduates; researchers. F. Alaya Ramapo College of New Jersey

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anne McClintock is an Associate Professor of English at Columbia University, and a SSRC-MacArthur Fellow. She is the author of monographs on Simone DeBeauvoir and Olive Schreiner, and has written for a number of publications on issues of gender and sexuality, including Critical Inquiry, Boundary 11, The Village Voice, and The New York Times Book Review.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.