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Plow-horse cavalry: the Caney Creek boys of the Thirty-fourth Texas. Text and photographs by Robert S. Weddle.

By: Weddle, Robert S.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Austin, Tex., Madrona Press [1974]Edition: [1st ed.].Description: xvi, 210 pages illustrations, map (on lining papers) 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Cavalry Regiment, 34th | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Regimental histories | Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Regimental historiesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Plow-horse cavalry.DDC classification: 973.7/464 LOC classification: E580.6 34th | .W42Summary: Robert S. Weddle weaves the letters exchanged between Americus Leonidas Nelms and his wife Minerva Jane--his maternal grandparents--during the Civil War into a narrative about the Civil War itself. He resists the temptation to make it a family story, offering evidence of heroism and self-sacrifice by those whose forebears served in the Confederacy. The Civil War story, from whatever angle it is viewed, is one of pathos, suffering, and tragedy. It is as much so when regarded in the perspective of the deserters and those who suffered unreasoning persecution for their Union sympathies as when seen in the eyes of the long-suffering and homesick Confederate soldier. The fact is epitomized in this study of the North Texas area, whose people were sharply divided on the matter of secession.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E580.6 34TH .W42 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100658483

Includes bibliographical references (pages 184-195) and index.

Robert S. Weddle weaves the letters exchanged between Americus Leonidas Nelms and his wife Minerva Jane--his maternal grandparents--during the Civil War into a narrative about the Civil War itself. He resists the temptation to make it a family story, offering evidence of heroism and self-sacrifice by those whose forebears served in the Confederacy. The Civil War story, from whatever angle it is viewed, is one of pathos, suffering, and tragedy. It is as much so when regarded in the perspective of the deserters and those who suffered unreasoning persecution for their Union sympathies as when seen in the eyes of the long-suffering and homesick Confederate soldier. The fact is epitomized in this study of the North Texas area, whose people were sharply divided on the matter of secession.

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