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A wind in the door / Madeleine L'Engle.

By: L'Engle, Madeleine.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, c1973ISBN: 0374384436; 9780374384432.Subject(s): Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Sick -- Juvenile fiction | Science fictionDDC classification: [Fic]
Contents:
Charles Wallace's dragons -- A Rip in the galaxy -- The Man in the night -- Proginoskes -- The First real test -- The Real Mr. Jenkins -- Metron Ariston -- Journey into the interior -- Farandolae and mitochondria -- Yadah -- Sporos -- A Wind in the door.
Summary: With Meg Murry's help, the dragons her six-year-old brother saw in the vegetable garden play an important part in his struggle between life and death.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
L566WI (Browse shelf) Available 0000100748193
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: CML Adolescent Fiction Area Close shelf browser
L4316IF If looks could kill / L5233UL Ultimate game : L566S A swiftly tilting planet / L566WI A wind in the door / L566WR A wrinkle in time / L566YO The young unicorns / L642DA Day of tears :

Charles Wallace's dragons -- A Rip in the galaxy -- The Man in the night -- Proginoskes -- The First real test -- The Real Mr. Jenkins -- Metron Ariston -- Journey into the interior -- Farandolae and mitochondria -- Yadah -- Sporos -- A Wind in the door.

With Meg Murry's help, the dragons her six-year-old brother saw in the vegetable garden play an important part in his struggle between life and death.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-The 50th anniversary of the publication of Madeleine L'Engle's Newbery award-winner, A Wrinkle in Time (Farrar, 1962), has spurred the rerecording of her science fiction/fantasies. Highly praised, A Wrinkle in Time launched what became a succession of books with intergalactic, intracellular, and time travels featuring socially-challenged Meg Murry, her younger brother Charles Wallace, and friend Calvin O'Keefe, who later became Meg's husband. In Wrinkle, they rescue Meg's physicist dad from the clutches of "It"-a mind-controlling entity. A Wind in the Door (Square Fish, pap. 2007) has Meg, Calvin, and fantastical creatures slipping into the mitochondria of a very-ill Charles Wallace. In A Swiftly Tilting Planet (Square Fish, pap. 2007), a teenaged Charles Wallace transcends time and danger to alter history so the world is no longer threatened by a belligerent dictator. Though Calvin is out of town, Charles is assisted by a grown, pregnant Meg through mind-to-mind flow. Though written decades ago, all three novels connect with current headlines on bullying, societal conformity, dangerous microorganisms, and potential threats of nuclear aggression. After an introduction spoken by L'Engle, Hope Davis narrates A Wrinkle in Time with careful intensity. Narrator Jennifer Ehle brings verve and emotional clarity to the other two titles. The sound quality is excellent. While some listeners who have enjoyed these titles originally read by L'Engle may miss the author's interpretation of her text, they will find that Davis and Ehle add youthful energy to these works. L'Engle's modern classics are school and public library standards, and these new recordings are a very good way to fill in any gaps.-Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Author Madeleine L'Engle was born in New York City on November 29, 1918. She graduated from Smith College. She is best known for A Wrinkle in Time (1962), which won the 1963 Newbery Medal for best American children's book. While many of her novels blend science fiction and fantasy, she has also written a series of autobiographical books, including Two Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage, which deals with the illness and death of her husband, soap opera actor Hugh Franklin. In 2004, she received a National Humanities Medal from President George W. Bush. She died on September 6, 2007 of natural causes. <p> Since 1976, Wheaton College in Illinois has maintained a special collection of L'Engle's papers, and a variety of other materials, dating back to 1919. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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