History, tales, and sketches / Washington Irving.

By: Irving, Washington, 1783-1859Material type: TextTextSeries: The Library of America: Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Literary Classics of the United States : Distributed to the trade in the United States and Canada by the Viking Press, c1983Description: 1126 p. ; 21 cmISBN: 0940450143; 9780940450141; 0521261163; 9780521261166Uniform titles: Selections. 1983 Subject(s): England -- Social life and customs -- 19th century | Hudson River Valley (N.Y. and N.J.) -- Fiction | Catskill Mountains Region (N.Y.) -- Fiction | Prose in English American writers, 1776-1830 - TextsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: History, tales, and sketches.DDC classification: 818/.209 LOC classification: PS2052 | 1983
Contents:
Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent. -- Salmagundi -- A history of New York -- The sketch book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.
Summary: A writer of great urbanity and poise, Washington Irving was America's first internationally acclaimed man of letters. Here in one volume are the writings that established his reputation and earned him the admiration of Hawthorne, Poe, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, and Dickens. Written in the character of an elderly gentleman of the old school, "Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent." is a series of comic reports on the theater, theater-goers, fashions, balls, courtships, duels, and marriages of his contemporary New York. "Salmagundi" continues this roguish style of satire and burlesque, and its freshness, energy, and accomplishment took the Anglo-American literary scene by storm. "A History of New York," a wild and hilarious spoof combining real New York history with political satire, is presented here in its original, unexpurgated version. "The Sketch Book" is a brilliant, captivating story collection that draws on vanishing folkways, depictions of Hudson Valley life, and fable; it contains Irving's best-loved stories, "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow."
List(s) this item appears in: ENGL 3308 "Dream Children"
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS2052 1983 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100088541

Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent. -- Salmagundi -- A history of New York -- The sketch book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

A writer of great urbanity and poise, Washington Irving was America's first internationally acclaimed man of letters. Here in one volume are the writings that established his reputation and earned him the admiration of Hawthorne, Poe, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, and Dickens. Written in the character of an elderly gentleman of the old school, "Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent." is a series of comic reports on the theater, theater-goers, fashions, balls, courtships, duels, and marriages of his contemporary New York. "Salmagundi" continues this roguish style of satire and burlesque, and its freshness, energy, and accomplishment took the Anglo-American literary scene by storm. "A History of New York," a wild and hilarious spoof combining real New York history with political satire, is presented here in its original, unexpurgated version. "The Sketch Book" is a brilliant, captivating story collection that draws on vanishing folkways, depictions of Hudson Valley life, and fable; it contains Irving's best-loved stories, "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow."

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Washington Irving, one of the first Americans to achieve international recognition as an author, was born in New York City in 1783. His A History of New York, published in 1809 under the name of Diedrich Knickerbocker, was a satirical history of New York that spanned the years from 1609 to 1664. Under another pseudonym, Geoffrey Crayon, he wrote The Sketch-book, which included essays about English folk customs, essays about the American Indian, and the two American stories for which he is most renowned--"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle."

Irving served as a member of the U.S. legation in Spain from 1826 to 1829 and as minister to Spain from 1842 to 1846. Following his return to the U.S. in 1846, he began work on a five-volume biography of Washington that was published from 1855-1859.

Washington Irving died in 1859 in New York.

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