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Dr. Montessori's own handbook.

By: Montessori, Maria, 1870-1952.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass., R. Bentley, [1914]Copyright date: ©1914Description: xii, 121 pages illustrations, portrait 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): Montessori method of educationAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Dr. Montessori's own handbook.DDC classification: 372
Contents:
Preface -- Introductory remarks -- A children's house -- The method -- Motor education -- Sensory education -- Language and knowledge of the world -- Freedom -- Writing -- The reading of music -- Arithmetic -- Moral factors.
Summary: At the age of 28, Montessori became directress of a tax-supported school for defective children. Working thirteen hours a day with the children, she developed materials and methods which allowed them to perform reasonably well on school problems previously considered far beyond their capacity. Her great triumph, in reality and in the newspapers, came when she presented children from mental institutions at the public examinations for primary certificates, which was as far as the average Italian ever went in formal education, and her children passed the exam. - Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
LB775 .M727 1964 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100797398

Preface -- Introductory remarks -- A children's house -- The method -- Motor education -- Sensory education -- Language and knowledge of the world -- Freedom -- Writing -- The reading of music -- Arithmetic -- Moral factors.

At the age of 28, Montessori became directress of a tax-supported school for defective children. Working thirteen hours a day with the children, she developed materials and methods which allowed them to perform reasonably well on school problems previously considered far beyond their capacity. Her great triumph, in reality and in the newspapers, came when she presented children from mental institutions at the public examinations for primary certificates, which was as far as the average Italian ever went in formal education, and her children passed the exam. - Jacket.

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