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Essays & lectures / Ralph Waldo Emerson.

By: Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.
Contributor(s): Porte, Joel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: The Library of America: Publisher: New York : Literary Classics of the U.S. : Distributed to the trade in the U.S. and Canada by Viking Press, c1983Description: 1321 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0940450151; 9780940450158.Uniform titles: Prose works. Selections Subject(s): American literatureDDC classification: 814/.3 LOC classification: PS1605 | 1983
Contents:
Nature -- Addresses -- Lectures -- Essays, first and second series -- Representative men -- English traits -- The conduct of life -- Uncollected prose.
Summary: The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfect gift for everyone.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS1605 1983 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100089598

Spine title: Essays and lectures.

"Joel Porte wrote the notes and selected the texts for this volume" -- Leaf ff. t.p.

Nature -- Addresses -- Lectures -- Essays, first and second series -- Representative men -- English traits -- The conduct of life -- Uncollected prose.

Includes bibliographical references.

The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfect gift for everyone.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Known primarily as the leader of the philosophical movement transcendentalism, which stresses the ties of humans to nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson, American poet and essayist, was born in Boston in 1803. From a long line of religious leaders, Emerson became the minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in 1829. He left the church in 1832 because of profound differences in interpretation and doubts about church doctrine. He visited England and met with British writers and philosophers. It was during this first excursion abroad that Emerson formulated his ideas for Self-Reliance. <p> He returned to the United States in 1833 and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. He began lecturing in Boston. His first book, Nature (1836), published anonymously, detailed his belief and has come to be regarded as his most significant original work on the essence of his philosophy of transcendentalism. The first volume of Essays (1841) contained some of Emerson's most popular works, including the renowned Self-Reliance. <p> Emerson befriended and influenced a number of American authors including Henry David Thoreau. It was Emerson's practice of keeping a journal that inspired Thoreau to do the same and set the stage for Thoreau's experiences at Walden Pond. Emerson married twice (his first wife Ellen died in 1831 of tuberculosis) and had four children (two boys and two girls) with his second wife, Lydia. His first born, Waldo, died at age six. Emerson died in Concord on April 27, 1882 at the age of 78 due to pneumonia and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, Massachusetts. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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