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The house of the seven gables. Edited by Seymour L. Gross.

By: Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 1804-1864.
Contributor(s): Gross, Seymour Lee, 1926- [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Norton critical edition: Publisher: New York, Norton [1967]Edition: [1st ed.].Description: x, 484 pages 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0393097056 (paper edition); 9780393097054 (paper edition); 0393042871 (cloth edition); 9780393042870 (cloth edition).Subject(s): Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 1804-1864. House of the seven gables | Haunted houses -- Fiction | Salem (Mass.) -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction.DDC classification: 813.33 Other classification: 18.06
Contents:
The text of The house of the seven gables -- Passages from The American notebooks (The downward path of great houses ; Marriage and the end of family hatreds ; The organ-grinder's monkey ; The tyranny of the past ; The locomotive ; The station) -- Love letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Mesmerism) -- The history of Massachusetts (Maule's curse) / Thomas Hutchinson -- Annals of Salem (A Salem murder) / Joseph B. Felt -- Hawthorne's daguerreotypist: scientist, artist, reformer / Alfred H. Marks -- The house of the seven gables: marble and mud / Evert A. Duyckinck -- The affluence of fancy / Henry F. Chorley -- The house of the seven gables: humor and pathos combined / Edwin P. Whipple -- The house of the seven gables / Henry James -- The house of the seven gables and American history / F.O. Matthiessen -- The social ethic / Lawrence S. Hall -- Shadow and substance: language and meaning in The house of the seven gables / Clark Griffith -- Holgrave's curious conversion / Rudolph Von Abele -- The ascending spiral curve / Hyatt H. Waggoner -- Who killed Judge Pyncheon? The role of the imagination in The house of the seven gables / Alfred H. Marks -- Evolution and regeneration: The house of the seven gables / Roy R. Male -- Aristocracy versus democracy and the chain of humanity / Marius Bewley -- Structure and theme in The house of the seven gables / William B. Dillingham -- The house of the seven gables: the religion of love / Alfred J. Levy -- Paradise regained at Maule's Well / Daniel G. Hoffman.
Summary: Literary criticism and interpretation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's work: The House of the Seven Gables. "The four Pyncheons live inside the blighted house: Hepzibah, an elderly recluse, Clifford, her feeble-minded brother, Phoebe, their young country cousin ... and Jaffrey, a devil incarnate whose greedy quest for secret wealth is marked by murder and terrible vengeance from a restless grave."
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS1861.A2 G76 1967 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100826171

"An authoritative text, backgrounds and sources, essays in criticism."

Includes bibliographical references (pages 483-484).

The text of The house of the seven gables -- Passages from The American notebooks (The downward path of great houses ; Marriage and the end of family hatreds ; The organ-grinder's monkey ; The tyranny of the past ; The locomotive ; The station) -- Love letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Mesmerism) -- The history of Massachusetts (Maule's curse) / Thomas Hutchinson -- Annals of Salem (A Salem murder) / Joseph B. Felt -- Hawthorne's daguerreotypist: scientist, artist, reformer / Alfred H. Marks -- The house of the seven gables: marble and mud / Evert A. Duyckinck -- The affluence of fancy / Henry F. Chorley -- The house of the seven gables: humor and pathos combined / Edwin P. Whipple -- The house of the seven gables / Henry James -- The house of the seven gables and American history / F.O. Matthiessen -- The social ethic / Lawrence S. Hall -- Shadow and substance: language and meaning in The house of the seven gables / Clark Griffith -- Holgrave's curious conversion / Rudolph Von Abele -- The ascending spiral curve / Hyatt H. Waggoner -- Who killed Judge Pyncheon? The role of the imagination in The house of the seven gables / Alfred H. Marks -- Evolution and regeneration: The house of the seven gables / Roy R. Male -- Aristocracy versus democracy and the chain of humanity / Marius Bewley -- Structure and theme in The house of the seven gables / William B. Dillingham -- The house of the seven gables: the religion of love / Alfred J. Levy -- Paradise regained at Maule's Well / Daniel G. Hoffman.

Literary criticism and interpretation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's work: The House of the Seven Gables. "The four Pyncheons live inside the blighted house: Hepzibah, an elderly recluse, Clifford, her feeble-minded brother, Phoebe, their young country cousin ... and Jaffrey, a devil incarnate whose greedy quest for secret wealth is marked by murder and terrible vengeance from a restless grave."

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up‘Hawthorne's tale about the brooding hold of the past over the present is a complex one, twisting and turning its way back through many generations of a venerable New England family, one of whose members was accused of witchcraft in 17th century Salem. More than 200 years later, we meet the family in its decaying, gabled mansion, still haunted by the presence of dead ancestors: Hepzibah, an elderly gentlewoman fallen on had times; her ineffectual brother, Clifford; and young Phoebe, a country maiden who cheerfully takes it upon herself to care for her two doddering relations. There's also Holgrave, a free-spirited daguerreotypist, who makes a surprising transformation into conventional respectability at the story's end. These people seem to be symbols for Hawthorne's theme more than full-bodied characters in their own right. As such, it can only be difficult for today's young adults to identify with them, especially since they are so caught up in a past that is all but unknown to present day sensibilities. Talented Joan Allen, twice nominated for Academy Awards, reads the tale in a clear, luminous voice. Because she has chosen not to do voices, however, it is sometimes difficult to tell which character is speaking. Still, she is more than equal to the task of handling Hawthorne's stately prose in a presentation that will be a good curriculum support for students of Hawthorne or those seeking special insight into this work of fiction.‘Carol Katz, Harrison Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts. When he was four years old, his father died. Years later, with financial help from his maternal relatives who recognized his literary talent, Hawthorne was able to enroll in Bowdoin College. <p> Among his classmates were the important literary and political figures Horatio Bridge, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Franklin Pierce. These friends supplied Hawthorne with employment during the early years after graduation while Hawthorne was still establishing himself as a legitimate author. <p> Hawthorne's first novel, Fanshawe, which he self-published in 1828, wasn't quite the success that he had hoped it would be. Not willing to give up, he began writing stories for Twice-Told Tales. These stories established Hawthorne as a leading writer. <p> In 1842, Hawthorne moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where he wrote a number of tales, including "Rappaccini's Daughter" and "Young Goodman Brown," that were later published as Mosses from an Old Manse. The overall theme of Hawthorne's novels was a deep concern with ethical problems of sin, punishment, and atonement. No one novel demonstrated that more vividly than The Scarlet Letter. This tale about the adulterous Puritan Hester Prynne is regarded as Hawthorne's best work and is a classic of American literature. Other famous novels written by Hawthorne include The House of Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance. <p> In 1852, Hawthorne wrote a campaign biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce. After Pierce was elected as President of the United States, he rewarded Hawthorne with the Consulship at Liverpool, England. Hawthorne died in his sleep on May 19, 1864, while on a trip with Franklin Pierce. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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