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Confederates in the attic : dispatches from the unfinished Civil War / Tony Horwitz.

By: Horwitz, Tony, 1958-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon Books, c1998Edition: 1st ed.Description: ix, 406 p. : 1 map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0679439781; 9780679439783.Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Influence | Horwitz, Tony, 1958- -- Travel -- Southern StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Confederates in the attic.DDC classification: 973.7 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Confederates in the attic -- North Carolina: Cats of the Confederacy -- South Carolina: In the better half of the world -- South Carolina: Shades of gray -- Kentucky: Dying for Dixie -- Virginia: A farb of the heart -- Tennessee: At the Foote of the master -- Tennessee: The ghost marks of Shiloh -- Mississippi: The Minié Ball pregnancy -- Virginia and beyond: The Civil Wargasm -- Georgia: Gone with the window -- Georgia: Still prisoners of war -- Alabama: Only living Confederate widow tells some -- Alabama: I had a dream -- Strike the tent .
Summary: Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. He joins "hardcore" reenactors; witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war; finds that Andersonville Prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of an eccentric pilgrim. Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, this book brings alive old battlefields and new ones--classrooms, courts, country bars--where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E468.9 .H78 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002043933

Includes index.

Confederates in the attic -- North Carolina: Cats of the Confederacy -- South Carolina: In the better half of the world -- South Carolina: Shades of gray -- Kentucky: Dying for Dixie -- Virginia: A farb of the heart -- Tennessee: At the Foote of the master -- Tennessee: The ghost marks of Shiloh -- Mississippi: The Minié Ball pregnancy -- Virginia and beyond: The Civil Wargasm -- Georgia: Gone with the window -- Georgia: Still prisoners of war -- Alabama: Only living Confederate widow tells some -- Alabama: I had a dream -- Strike the tent .

Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. He joins "hardcore" reenactors; witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war; finds that Andersonville Prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of an eccentric pilgrim. Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, this book brings alive old battlefields and new ones--classrooms, courts, country bars--where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Like many Americans, Wall Street Journal senior writer and Pulitzer Prize winner Horwitz (Baghdad Without a Map, LJ 1/91) is obsessed with the Civil War. In his new book, he journeys to battlefield sites and joins Civil War reenactors. Horwitz finds that most reenactors glorify battlefield valor and that white Southerners remember mostly the sense of loss‘the war, the antebellum era, and the agrarian way of life. He also understands that many black Southerners want Americans to remember that slavery caused war and that race is the war's legacy. As Horwitz demonstrates, the Civil War is alive, raw, and poignant, and his entertaining dispatches remind us that our memory of it is concerned more with symbolism and today's values than with an accurate understanding of the American culture that made the war possible. Recommended for public and academic libraries.‘Charles L. Lumpkins, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Station (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

YA-Fascination with the Civil War runs in Horwitz's family. His Russian immigrant great-grandfather continued to pore over books on the subject at age 101 and his father read to the author each night from a 10-volume photographic history. Years later, the author and his wife awoke one morning to the sounds of a mock Civil War battle being filmed in front of their Virginia home. Subsequent conversations with the participants rekindled this enthusiasm and launched Horwitz on a year-long quest to determine why the Civil War continues to enthrall so many Americans. He journeyed throughout the Old South, visiting battlefields and museums. He joined "super hardcores" such as Robert Lee Hodge, learning about "farbs," "spooning," and "period rushes." He conversed with the only living Confederate widow and witnessed both the "Catechism" taught to Children of Confederate Veterans and the attitudes of black teens in Selma, AL. While his encounters ran the gamut from amusing to infuriating to positively frightening, this Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter relates them all with clarity and honesty. Read Confederates simply for the engrossing, well-written account of contemporary American culture that it is or choose any chapter to spark or enliven class discussion. Don't miss this one.-Dori DeSpain, Herndon Fortnightly Library, Fairfax County, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anthony Lander Horwitz was born in Washington, D. C. on June 9, 1958. He received a bachelor's degree in history from Brown University and a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1983. After working as a union organizer in Mississippi, he became a newspaper reporter. <p> He was an education reporter for The Fort Wayne News-Sentinel in Indiana from 1983 to 1984 and a general assignment reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald in Australia from 1985 to 1987. He joined The Wall Street Journal in 1990 as a foreign correspondent in Europe and the Middle East. He and his wife Geraldine Brooks won the Overseas Press Club's Hal Boyle Award in 1990 for their coverage of the Persian Gulf war. He returned to the United States in 1993 and was assigned to The Journal's Pittsburgh bureau. He won the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting for his accounts of working conditions in low-wage jobs. He later wrote for The New Yorker on the Middle East before becoming an author of nonfiction books. <p> His first book, Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War, was published in 1998. His other books included Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before, A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World, Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War, and Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American Divide. He died on May 27, 2019 at the age of 60. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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