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The uncivil war : irregular warfare in the upper South, 1861-1865 / Robert R. Mackey.

By: Mackey, Robert Russell.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Campaigns and commanders: v. 5.Publisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2004Description: xii, 288 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0806136243 (alk. paper); 9780806136240 (alk. paper); 9780806137360 (pbk.); 0806137363 (pbk.).Subject(s): Confederate States of America. Army -- History | United States. Army -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | Guerrillas -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Guerrilla warfare -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Raids (Military science) -- History -- 19th century | Ambushes and surprises -- History -- 19th century | Counterinsurgency -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Underground movements | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- CampaignsDDC classification: 973.7/3 LOC classification: E470.45 | .M13 2004
Contents:
Introduction : Civil War irregular warfare in theory and practice -- The Confederacy's self-inflicted wound : the guerilla war in Arkansas, 1862-1865 -- Fire, provosts, and Tories : the federal counterinsurgency campaign in Arkansas -- John Singleton Mosby and the Confederate partisan war in Virginia -- Misreading the enemy : the Union Army's failed response to partisan warfare in Virginia -- The heyday of raiding warfare : Morgan and Forrest in Tennessee and Kentucky, 1862 -- Great raids, great reforms, and great disasters : the 1863 spring and summer raiding campaign -- Conclusion : the end of the uncivil war.
Review: "In The Uncivil War, Robert R. Mackey outlines the Southern strategy of waging war across an entire region, measures the Northern response, and explains the outcome." "Complex military issues shaped both the Confederate irregular war and the Union response. Through detailed accounts of Rebel guerrilla, partisan, and raider activities, Mackey strips away romanticized notions of how the "shadow war" was fought, proving instead that irregular warfare was an integral part of Confederate strategy.".Summary: "Mackey's book demonstrates that the failure of the shadow war can be traced both to poor Confederate command, which allowed irregulars to prey on their own neighbors, and to effective Union countermeasures. As a result, by 1865, the Confederacy had collapsed on both conventional and unconventional fields of conflict."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E470.45 .M13 2004 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002043958

Includes bibliographical references (p. [257]-277) and index.

Introduction : Civil War irregular warfare in theory and practice -- The Confederacy's self-inflicted wound : the guerilla war in Arkansas, 1862-1865 -- Fire, provosts, and Tories : the federal counterinsurgency campaign in Arkansas -- John Singleton Mosby and the Confederate partisan war in Virginia -- Misreading the enemy : the Union Army's failed response to partisan warfare in Virginia -- The heyday of raiding warfare : Morgan and Forrest in Tennessee and Kentucky, 1862 -- Great raids, great reforms, and great disasters : the 1863 spring and summer raiding campaign -- Conclusion : the end of the uncivil war.

"In The Uncivil War, Robert R. Mackey outlines the Southern strategy of waging war across an entire region, measures the Northern response, and explains the outcome." "Complex military issues shaped both the Confederate irregular war and the Union response. Through detailed accounts of Rebel guerrilla, partisan, and raider activities, Mackey strips away romanticized notions of how the "shadow war" was fought, proving instead that irregular warfare was an integral part of Confederate strategy.".

"Mackey's book demonstrates that the failure of the shadow war can be traced both to poor Confederate command, which allowed irregulars to prey on their own neighbors, and to effective Union countermeasures. As a result, by 1865, the Confederacy had collapsed on both conventional and unconventional fields of conflict."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The rise of insurgents in the aftermath of invasion is a common feature of modern wars, but Mackey, a strategic plans and policy specialist at the Pentagon, demonstrates that guerillas were also a key element of the Civil War. The author explores the complex conflict between Confederate insurgents and the Union effort to wage an effective counterinsurgency by demonstrating that instead of an extemporized war, the South waged a coordinated partisan campaign countered by organized Northern efforts to contain them. Confederate insurgency took several forms, including barely organized local bushwhackers, highly organized partisans operating behind Union lines, and the large-scale cavalry operations of John Morgan and John Mosby. The Union countered these groups by fortifying lines of communication, improving militias to protect regions in the Union rear, and constructing blockhouses to control rebel-held areas. In the end, the Union efforts proved effective, and the Confederate insurgency collapsed along with the conventional defense of the South. Relatively brief but very effective, the book uses more than enough supporting evidence to argue its thesis, resulting in one of the most innovative works on the Civil War in recent years. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. S. J. Ramold Virginia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert R. Mackey, a Major in the U.S. Army, has been an army officer since 1988 and now serves as a strategic plans and policy specialist at the Pentagon. The Uncivil War is based on his dissertation and has been required reading at the Army's Command and General Staff College and the Advanced Military Studies programs

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