The Crimean War : a history / Orlando Figes.

By: Figes, OrlandoMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Metropolitan Books, 2010Edition: 1st edDescription: xxiii, 576 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cmISBN: 9780805074604; 0805074600Uniform titles: Crimea Subject(s): Crimean War, 1853-1856DDC classification: 947/.0738 LOC classification: DK214 | .F53 2010
Contents:
Religious wars -- Eastern questions -- The Russian menace -- The end of peace in Europe -- Phoney war -- First blood to the Turks -- Alma -- Sevastopol in the autumn -- Generals January and February -- Cannon fodder -- The fall of Sevastopol -- Paris and the new order -- Epilogue : The Crimean War in national myth and memory.
Summary: From "the great storyteller of modern Russian historians" comes the definitive account of the Crimean War, a forgotten war that shaped the modern age. Figes reconstructs the first full conflagration of modernity, a global industrialized struggle fought with unusual ferocity and incompetence.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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DK214 .F53 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 4000000000003

"Published simultaneously in the United Kingdom by Penguin Books, London, as 'Crimea'"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Religious wars -- Eastern questions -- The Russian menace -- The end of peace in Europe -- Phoney war -- First blood to the Turks -- Alma -- Sevastopol in the autumn -- Generals January and February -- Cannon fodder -- The fall of Sevastopol -- Paris and the new order -- Epilogue : The Crimean War in national myth and memory.

From "the great storyteller of modern Russian historians" comes the definitive account of the Crimean War, a forgotten war that shaped the modern age. Figes reconstructs the first full conflagration of modernity, a global industrialized struggle fought with unusual ferocity and incompetence.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historians have generally relegated the Crimean War to the status of a minor if not totally insignificant conflict waged by inept armies led by incompetent generals. Figes (Birkbeck College, Univ. of London) seeks to correct the first of these impressions by demonstrating that the war was a seminal event in the evolution of the policies of the major European powers toward the crumbling Ottoman Empire. To a large extent, he is successful. The author devotes considerable attention to Tsar Nicholas I's increasing occupation with his role as the protector of Orthodox Christianity and the growing concern of the other European powers with Russian expansion--especially England, some of whose leaders bordered on being Russophobic. Figes provides considerable evidence going back to the early 19th century to trace the origins of these policies, devoting a full third of the book to this subject. The war itself occupies only just over half the book, and adds little to what is already known. By placing the conflict in a broader context, however, Figes successfully demonstrates that the Crimean War does have a more important place in 19th-century European diplomacy than is commonly assumed. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. H. Larson Lycoming College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Orlando Figes is the author of The Crimean War: A History , The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin's Russia , Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia , and A People's Tragedy , which have been translated into more than twenty languages. The recipient of the Wolfson History Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award, among others, Figes is a professor of history at Birkbeck College, University of London.

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