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Moscow, December 25, 1991 : the last day of the Soviet Union / Conor O'Clery.

By: O'Clery, Conor.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : PublicAffairs, c2011Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxi, 316 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781586487966 (hardcover : alk. paper); 1586487965 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9781610390125 (e-book); 1610390121 (e-book).Subject(s): Moscow (Russia) -- History -- 20th century | Gorbachev, Mikhail Sergeevich, 1931- | Yeltsin, Boris Nikolayevich, 1931-2007 | Soviet Union -- History -- 1985-1991 | Soviet Union -- Politics and government -- 1985-1991 | Moscow (Russia) -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Moscow (Russia) -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Moscow (Russia) -- BiographyDDC classification: 947.085/4 Summary: The implosion of the Soviet Union was the culmination of a gripping game played out between two men who intensely disliked each other and had different concepts for the future. Mikhail Gorbachev, a sophisticated and urbane reformer, sought to modernize and preserve the USSR; Boris Yeltsin, a coarse and a hard drinking "bulldozer," wished to destroy the union and create a capitalist Russia. The defeat of the August 1991 coup attempt by hardline communists shook Gorbachev's authority and was a triumph for Yeltsin. But it took four months of intrigue and double-dealing before Yeltsin could hustle Gorbachev out of the Kremlin. Conor O'Clery has written a truly suspenseful thriller of the Cold War's final act: the internal power plays, the shifting alliances, the betrayals, the mysterious three colonels carrying the briefcase with the nuclear codes, and the jockeying to exploit the future.--From publisher description.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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DK601.2 .O25 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002075638

The implosion of the Soviet Union was the culmination of a gripping game played out between two men who intensely disliked each other and had different concepts for the future. Mikhail Gorbachev, a sophisticated and urbane reformer, sought to modernize and preserve the USSR; Boris Yeltsin, a coarse and a hard drinking "bulldozer," wished to destroy the union and create a capitalist Russia. The defeat of the August 1991 coup attempt by hardline communists shook Gorbachev's authority and was a triumph for Yeltsin. But it took four months of intrigue and double-dealing before Yeltsin could hustle Gorbachev out of the Kremlin. Conor O'Clery has written a truly suspenseful thriller of the Cold War's final act: the internal power plays, the shifting alliances, the betrayals, the mysterious three colonels carrying the briefcase with the nuclear codes, and the jockeying to exploit the future.--From publisher description.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Writing with a journalist's flair for detail, O'Clery (The Billionaire Who Wasn't), Moscow correspondent for the Irish Times during the breakup of the Soviet Union, here offers a well-researched look at the last day of the Soviet Union and provides a balanced portrait of the characters involved. He is careful to consider the myriad factors that affected President Mikhail Gorbachev and his successor, Boris Yeltsin, in their struggle to bring their conflicting views of the future of their country into reality, including how international opinion and support reinforced their respective mindsets. O'Clery keeps his lens trained on the interaction and rivalry between these two personalities and discusses how their conflicts directed their decision making and how their tumultuous relationship drew others into action. Rather than stopping at that fateful Christmas day in 1991-the dissolution of the Soviet Union-O'Clery also provides a succinct history of the major events afterward, tracing Russia's rocky conversion to a market economy and the reemergence of communist ideology in the period following Yeltsin's election that year. VERDICT Academics and lay readers alike will find this book a revealing addition to the history of modern Russia, as well as an engrossing journalistic study of two of Russia's most intriguing political leaders.-Elizabeth Zeitz, Otterbein Univ. Lib., Westerville, OH (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Conor O'Clery is a journalist for The Irish Times who has specialized in Irish politics and Anglo-Irish relations. He is the author of Melting Snow and Daring Diplomacy. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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