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A planet of viruses / Carl Zimmer.

By: Zimmer, Carl, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago ; London : University of Chicago Press, c2011Description: x, 109 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780226983356 (cloth : alk. paper); 0226983358 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): VirusesDDC classification: 362.196/9
Contents:
"A contagious living fluid" : tobacco mosaic virus -- Old Companions. The uncommon cold: rhinovirus -- Looking down from the stars: influenza virus -- Rabbits with horns: human papillomavirus -- Everywhere, in All Things. -- The enemy of our enemy: bacteriophages -- The infected ocean: marine phages -- Our inner parasites: endogenous retroviruses -- The Viral Future. The young scourge: human immunodeficiency virus -- Becoming an American: West Nile virus -- Predicting the next plague: severe acute respiratory syndrome and ebola -- The long goodbye: smallpox -- The alien in the watercooler: mimivirus.
Summary: Viruses are the smallest living things known to science, and yet they hold the entire planet in their sway. We are most familiar with the viruses that give us colds or the flu, but viruses also cause a vast range of other diseases. Viruses have been a part of our lives for so long, in fact, that we are actually part virus: the human genome contains more DNA from viruses than our own genes. Meanwhile, scientists are discovering viruses everywhere they look: in the soil, in the ocean, even in deep caves miles underground. Here, science writer Carl Zimmer presents the latest research on how viruses hold sway over our lives and our biosphere, how viruses helped give rise to the first life forms, how viruses are producing new diseases, how we can harness viruses for our own ends, and how viruses will continue to control our fate for years to come.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
QR 360 .Z65 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 4000000000014
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
QR 360 .Z65 2011 (Browse shelf) 2 Available 0000002106409
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QR181 .P335 2015 The immune system / QR184.3 .M54 HLA without tears / QR201.T6 M87 2012 Invincible microbe : QR 360 .Z65 2011 A planet of viruses / QR389.H38 2012 Viruses : QV39 .N9745 2018 Nursing 2018 drug handbook. R118.6 .G37 2011 Health sciences literature review made easy :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 97-101) and index.

"A contagious living fluid" : tobacco mosaic virus -- Old Companions. The uncommon cold: rhinovirus -- Looking down from the stars: influenza virus -- Rabbits with horns: human papillomavirus -- Everywhere, in All Things. -- The enemy of our enemy: bacteriophages -- The infected ocean: marine phages -- Our inner parasites: endogenous retroviruses -- The Viral Future. The young scourge: human immunodeficiency virus -- Becoming an American: West Nile virus -- Predicting the next plague: severe acute respiratory syndrome and ebola -- The long goodbye: smallpox -- The alien in the watercooler: mimivirus.

Viruses are the smallest living things known to science, and yet they hold the entire planet in their sway. We are most familiar with the viruses that give us colds or the flu, but viruses also cause a vast range of other diseases. Viruses have been a part of our lives for so long, in fact, that we are actually part virus: the human genome contains more DNA from viruses than our own genes. Meanwhile, scientists are discovering viruses everywhere they look: in the soil, in the ocean, even in deep caves miles underground. Here, science writer Carl Zimmer presents the latest research on how viruses hold sway over our lives and our biosphere, how viruses helped give rise to the first life forms, how viruses are producing new diseases, how we can harness viruses for our own ends, and how viruses will continue to control our fate for years to come.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A Planet of Viruses is a brief, highly accessible introduction to viruses and their impact on the world. Zimmer, an award-winning science journalist, author, and Yale University lecturer, traces the history of people's understanding of viruses, using stories of specific viruses to illustrate biological principles: how epidemiology led to an understanding of cervical cancer being a sexually transmitted infection, how viruses evolve to infect new species, and how war and politics can be roadblocks to disease eradication. The accounts also illustrate ethical issues in virology: should strains of deadly viruses be maintained in secure laboratories in order to study them, or is it better to destroy the viruses completely? The book includes six pages of scholarly references for further reading. Though geared to general readers, the book may also interest students in the life and health sciences. The second edition was updated to include new viral outbreaks and recent research findings. Libraries with the first edition (CH, Oct'11, 49-0845) should consider purchasing the second edition. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All undergraduate students and general audiences. --Jolene M. Miller, University of Toledo

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<br> Carl Zimmer is a lecturer at Yale University, where he teaches writing about science and the environment. He is the author of numerous books, including Microcosm ; Parasite Rex ; Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea ; At the Water's Edge ; and Soul Made Flesh . His numerous essays and articles on the life sciences have appeared in the pages of the New York Times , Scientific American , Discover , Time , Science , Popular Science , and National Geographic . His work has been anthologized in both The Best American Science Writing and The Best American Science and Nature Writing series.

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