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Code/space : software and everyday life / Rob Kitchin and Martin Dodge.

By: Kitchin, Rob.
Contributor(s): Dodge, Martin, 1971-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Software studies: Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2011Description: xi, 290 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780262042482 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0262042487.Subject(s): Computers and civilization | Computer software -- Social aspectsDDC classification: 303.48/34
Contents:
I: Introduction -- Introducing code/space -- The nature of software -- II: The difference software makes -- Remaking everyday objects -- The transduction of space -- Automated management -- Software, creativity, and empowerment -- III: The transduction of everyday spatialities -- Air travel -- Home -- Consumption -- IV: Future code/space -- Everyware -- A manifesto for software studies.
Summary: Rob Kitchin and Martin dodge examine software from a spatial perspective, analyzing the dyadic relationship of software and space. The production of space, they argue, is increasingly dependent on code, and code is written to produce space. Kitchin and Dodge argue that software, through its ability to do work in the world, transduces space. They develop a set of conceptual tools for identifying and understanding the interrelationship of software, space, and everyday life, and illustrate their argument with rich empirical material. And, finally, they issue a manifesto, calling for critical scholarship into the production and workings of code rather than simply the technologies it enables---a new kind of social science focused on explaining the social, economic, and spatial contours of software.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
QA76.9 .C66 K48 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 4000000000043

Includes bibliographical references (p. [267]-284) and index.

I: Introduction -- Introducing code/space -- The nature of software -- II: The difference software makes -- Remaking everyday objects -- The transduction of space -- Automated management -- Software, creativity, and empowerment -- III: The transduction of everyday spatialities -- Air travel -- Home -- Consumption -- IV: Future code/space -- Everyware -- A manifesto for software studies.

Rob Kitchin and Martin dodge examine software from a spatial perspective, analyzing the dyadic relationship of software and space. The production of space, they argue, is increasingly dependent on code, and code is written to produce space. Kitchin and Dodge argue that software, through its ability to do work in the world, transduces space. They develop a set of conceptual tools for identifying and understanding the interrelationship of software, space, and everyday life, and illustrate their argument with rich empirical material. And, finally, they issue a manifesto, calling for critical scholarship into the production and workings of code rather than simply the technologies it enables---a new kind of social science focused on explaining the social, economic, and spatial contours of software.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Code/Space creates a foundational vocabulary for talking about code (software) and its relations to physical space, social space, and the built environment. As part of the "Software Studies" series, which addresses, if not actively forms, the field--in this case, as it relates to human geography--this is an invaluable contribution. Some key points defined within this vocabulary are the difference between space (uncoded), coded space (affected by code), and code/space (code as infrastructure for space), the need to delineate between data and captured data ("capta"), and a hierarchy of the many different ways in which objects are encoded and the significance thereof. Although the middle of the book is a dry catalog of examples supporting the arguments of human geographers Kitchin (National Univ. of Maynooth, Ireland) and Dodge (Univ. of Manchester, UK), the arguments at the beginning and end are a solid contribution to the field. These arguments revolve around the idea that space is an active agent in the production of the social, and that code, through a process of collaborative transduction, "modulates the conditions under which sociospatial processes operate." This is a critical work for anyone interested in the social relations of software and computers. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. P. L. Kantor formerly, Southern Vermont College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Rob Kitchin is Professor of Human Geography and Director of the National Institute of Regional and Spatial Analysis at the National University of Maynooth, Ireland.</p>

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