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Evolutionary bioinformatics / by Donald R. Forsdyke.

By: Forsdyke, Donald R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Springer.Publisher: New York : Springer, c2006Description: 1 online resource (xix, 424 p.) : ill., ports.ISBN: 9780387334196; 038733419X.Subject(s): Bioinformatics | Evolutionary genetics | GenomesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Evolutionary bioinformatics.Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Part 1. Information and DNA: Memory, a phenomenon of arrangement -- Chargaff's first parity rule -- Information levels and barriers. Part 2. Parity and Non-Parity: Chargaffs second parity rule -- Stems and loops -- Chargaff's cluster rule. Part 3. Mutaton and speciation: Species survival and arrival -- Chargaff's GC rule. Part 4. Contact within genomes: Conflict Resolution -- omplexity. Part 5. Conflct between genomes: Self/not-self? -- The crowded Cytosol. Part 6. Sex and Error-correction: -- Rebooting the genome -- The fifth letter.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QH324.2 .F67 2006 (Browse shelf) http://ezproxy.uttyler.edu:2048/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-33419-6 Available ocn649414245

Includes bibliographical references (p. [361]-391) and index.

Part 1. Information and DNA: Memory, a phenomenon of arrangement -- Chargaff's first parity rule -- Information levels and barriers. Part 2. Parity and Non-Parity: Chargaffs second parity rule -- Stems and loops -- Chargaff's cluster rule. Part 3. Mutaton and speciation: Species survival and arrival -- Chargaff's GC rule. Part 4. Contact within genomes: Conflict Resolution -- omplexity. Part 5. Conflct between genomes: Self/not-self? -- The crowded Cytosol. Part 6. Sex and Error-correction: -- Rebooting the genome -- The fifth letter.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In Evolutionary Bioinformatics, Forsdyke (Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario) sounds a call to arms for those who believe that genomics has been "gene-centric" for too long. This leads to this reviewer's major criticism of the book: it begins in a defensive tone and spends too much time discussing the false dichotomy between "gene-centered" bioinformatics and "non-gene-centered" bioinformatics. The text also relies heavily on long quotations from prior works, which is very distracting. The topics are presented with a historical perspective and with a level of analysis and interpretation that is often missing in books. This volume covers a very broad scientific area. The early chapters deal with how information is stored, copied, and transferred. The bulk of the book discusses many different, interesting, complex problems, ranging from why nucleic acids form stem-loops, to how introns and exons evolved, to (this reviewer's favorite) how proteins live and work in the crowded cytosol. The book does contain odd digressions, such as in the epilogue, where the author warns that the "science literature has tended to become a pat-on-the-back literature." Overall, several thought-provoking ideas are presented, but they are hidden, and some effort is required to find them. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. D. Carroll Florida Institute of Technology

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