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The revolution of 1861 : the American Civil War in the age of nationalist conflict / Andre M. Fleche.

By: Fleche, Andre M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Civil War America (Series): Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2012]Copyright date: ©2012Description: xii, 204 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780807835234 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807835234 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes | Nationalism -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Nationalism -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Nationalism -- Confederate States of America -- History | Self-determination, National -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Self-determination, National -- Europe -- History -- 19th century | Europe -- History -- 1848-1849 | Revolutions -- Europe -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 973.7
Contents:
Introduction : the American Civil War and the age of revolution -- World revolutions and the coming of the American Civil War -- The revolution of 1861 -- The problem of northern nationalism -- The South and the principle of self-determination -- The last best hope of earth -- The white republic -- Conclusion : American nationalism and the nineteenth-century world.
Summary: "Grounding the causes and philosophies of the Civil War in an international context, Andre Fleche examines how questions of national self-determination, race, class, and labor the world over influenced American interpretations of the strains on the Union and the growing differences between North and South. Setting familiar events in an international context, Fleche enlarges our understanding of nationalism in the nineteenth century"--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E459 .F54 2012 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002128973

Includes bibliographical references (pages 183-198) and index.

Introduction : the American Civil War and the age of revolution -- World revolutions and the coming of the American Civil War -- The revolution of 1861 -- The problem of northern nationalism -- The South and the principle of self-determination -- The last best hope of earth -- The white republic -- Conclusion : American nationalism and the nineteenth-century world.

"Grounding the causes and philosophies of the Civil War in an international context, Andre Fleche examines how questions of national self-determination, race, class, and labor the world over influenced American interpretations of the strains on the Union and the growing differences between North and South. Setting familiar events in an international context, Fleche enlarges our understanding of nationalism in the nineteenth century"--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Brief but admirably concise and cogent, this volume focuses on some ideological dimensions of the US Civil War. Fleche (Castleton State College) places the conflict in the broader context of evolving conceptions of nationalism in an era of widespread nationalist turmoil. The book's six chapters examine the domestic debate over the meaning of foreign nationalist revolts (chiefly those of Europe in 1848), diverging Northern and Southern theories of nationalism during the Civil War, and finally how the debate over slavery transformed thinking about nationalism. Working from primary sources that include manuscript collections, official documents, newspapers, and periodicals, as well as from secondary sources, the author convincingly chronicles the influence of refugee "Forty-eighters" on the debate, demonstrating that while many were drawn to the Unionist vision of nationhood, others found Southern professions of the primacy of self-determination more compelling. Likewise, many Americans based their understandings of nationalism on nationalist struggles abroad, with Northerners and Southerners often interpreting these foreign conflicts quite differently. The chapter dealing with how emancipation completely reshaped the debate about the meaning of nationalism is especially laudable. This study demonstrates that there are still fertile fields of inquiry about a much-studied war. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. B. T. Browne Broward College

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