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Confederate reckoning : power and politics in the Civil War South / Stephanie McCurry.

By: McCurry, Stephanie.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2010Description: 449 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780674045897 (hc : alk. paper); 9780674064218 (pbk.); 0674064216 (pbk.); 0674045890.Subject(s): Confederate States of America -- Politics and government | Confederate States of America -- Social conditions | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | Women -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Women | African Americans -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- African Americans | Slavery -- Political aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Social aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 973.7/1 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Prologue: The Confederate project -- Who are the people? -- The brothers' war -- Antigone's claim -- Soldiers' wives and the politics of subsistence -- Women numerous and armed -- "Amor patriae" -- "Our open enemies" -- The fall -- Epilogue: Confederate reckoning.
Awards: Pulitzer Prize for History finalist, 2011.Review: "The story of the Confederate States of America, the proslavery, antidemocratic nation created by white Southern slaveholders to protect their property, has been told many times in heroic and martial narratives. Now, however, Stephanie McCurry tells a very different tale of the Confederate experience. When the grandiosity of Southerners' national ambitions met the harsh realities of wartime crises, unintended consequences ensued. Although Southern statesmen and generals had built the most powerful slave regime in the Western world, they had excluded the majority of their own people - white women and slaves - and thereby sowed the seeds of their demise." "Wartime scarcity of food, labor, and soldiers tested the Confederate vision at every point and created domestic crises to match those found on the battlefields. Women and slaves became critical political actors as they contested government enlistment and tax and welfare policies, and struggled for their freedom. The attempt to repress a majority of its own population backfired on the Confederate State of America as the disenfranchised demanded to be counted and considered in the great struggle. The government was forced to become accountable to women and slaves, provoking an astounding transformation of the slaveholders' state. Confederate Reckoning is the startling story of this epic political battle in which women and slaves helped to decide the fate of the Confederacy and the outcome of the Civil War."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E487 .M18 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002044436

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Prologue: The Confederate project -- Who are the people? -- The brothers' war -- Antigone's claim -- Soldiers' wives and the politics of subsistence -- Women numerous and armed -- "Amor patriae" -- "Our open enemies" -- The fall -- Epilogue: Confederate reckoning.

"The story of the Confederate States of America, the proslavery, antidemocratic nation created by white Southern slaveholders to protect their property, has been told many times in heroic and martial narratives. Now, however, Stephanie McCurry tells a very different tale of the Confederate experience. When the grandiosity of Southerners' national ambitions met the harsh realities of wartime crises, unintended consequences ensued. Although Southern statesmen and generals had built the most powerful slave regime in the Western world, they had excluded the majority of their own people - white women and slaves - and thereby sowed the seeds of their demise." "Wartime scarcity of food, labor, and soldiers tested the Confederate vision at every point and created domestic crises to match those found on the battlefields. Women and slaves became critical political actors as they contested government enlistment and tax and welfare policies, and struggled for their freedom. The attempt to repress a majority of its own population backfired on the Confederate State of America as the disenfranchised demanded to be counted and considered in the great struggle. The government was forced to become accountable to women and slaves, provoking an astounding transformation of the slaveholders' state. Confederate Reckoning is the startling story of this epic political battle in which women and slaves helped to decide the fate of the Confederacy and the outcome of the Civil War."--Jacket.

Pulitzer Prize for History finalist, 2011.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

That wars often have unanticipated results is clear. As McCurry (Penn) vividly demonstrates, in the case of the Confederate States of America (CSA), those results were both ironic and far-reaching. Conceived as a slaveholding republic, the CSA found itself having to confront the politics of its most marginalized constituencies, poor white women and slaves. The former, left destitute by the army's rapacious needs for men and supplies, created an identity as "soldier's wives" and by letter, petition, and violent protest forced Confederate authorities to alter policies to meet their demands. The latter, recognizing the value that their labor held for both sides, leveraged it to achieve the goal of freedom. In the end, the exigencies of war would force the Confederacy into a debate on the contradictions of a slave's position as both person and property and the meaning of emancipation for a slaveholding republic. Whether these events were of "world historical proportions" or as "transformational" as claimed can be argued, but that they are vital to a full understanding of the war cannot be denied. An important book for all libraries with Civil War collections. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. D. Butts Gordon College (GA)

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