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Manifest destinies : America's westward expansion and the road to the Civil War / Steven E. Woodworth.

By: Woodworth, Steven E.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2010Edition: 1st ed.ISBN: 9780307265241; 0307265242.Subject(s): Manifest Destiny | Mexican War, 1846-1848 | United States -- Territorial expansion | United States -- History -- 1815-1861 | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes
Contents:
The two-party system. The log cabin and hard cider campaign ; Tyler, Clay, and the durability of the two-party system ; Abolitionism -- Westward expansion. The Oregon Trail ; The allure and the danger of California ; The Mormons and their migration -- The politics of expansion. Tyler and Texas ; The election of 1844 ; Texas annexation -- War with Mexico. Armies along the Rio Grande ; The Monterrey campaign ; New Mexico, Chihuahua, and California ; Buena Vista ; Veracruz, Cerro Gordo, and the politics of expansion ; To the gates of Mexico City ; A conquered capital and a negotiated peace -- The political system and the controversies of expansion. The election of 1848 ; The California gold rush ; California and the expansion of slavery ; The struggle for compromise.
Summary: A sweeping history of the 1840s that captures America's enormous sense of possibility that inspired it's growth and shows how the extraordinary expansion of territories forced the nation to come to grips with the deep rift that would bring war just a decade later. The author gives us a portrait of America at its most vibrant and expansive. It was a decade in which the nation significantly enlarged its boundaries, taking Texas, New Mexico, California, and the Pacific Northwest; William Henry Harrison ran the first modern populist campaign, focusing on entertaining voters rather than on discussing issues; prospectors headed west to search for gold; Joseph Smith founded a new religion; railroads and telegraph lines connected the country's disparate populations as never before. When the 1840s dawned, Americans were feeling optimistic about the future: the population was growing, economic conditions were improving, and peace had reigned for nearly thirty years. A hopeful nation looked to the West, where vast areas of unsettled land seemed to promise prosperity to anyone resourceful enough to take advantage. And yet political tensions roiled below the surface; as the country took on new lands, slavery emerged as an irreconcilable source of disagreement between North and South, and secession reared its head for the first time. This book is an account of a crucial decade that forged a young nation's character and destiny.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E179.5 .W65 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002129153

Includes bibliographical references (p. 359-394) and index.

The two-party system. The log cabin and hard cider campaign ; Tyler, Clay, and the durability of the two-party system ; Abolitionism -- Westward expansion. The Oregon Trail ; The allure and the danger of California ; The Mormons and their migration -- The politics of expansion. Tyler and Texas ; The election of 1844 ; Texas annexation -- War with Mexico. Armies along the Rio Grande ; The Monterrey campaign ; New Mexico, Chihuahua, and California ; Buena Vista ; Veracruz, Cerro Gordo, and the politics of expansion ; To the gates of Mexico City ; A conquered capital and a negotiated peace -- The political system and the controversies of expansion. The election of 1848 ; The California gold rush ; California and the expansion of slavery ; The struggle for compromise.

A sweeping history of the 1840s that captures America's enormous sense of possibility that inspired it's growth and shows how the extraordinary expansion of territories forced the nation to come to grips with the deep rift that would bring war just a decade later. The author gives us a portrait of America at its most vibrant and expansive. It was a decade in which the nation significantly enlarged its boundaries, taking Texas, New Mexico, California, and the Pacific Northwest; William Henry Harrison ran the first modern populist campaign, focusing on entertaining voters rather than on discussing issues; prospectors headed west to search for gold; Joseph Smith founded a new religion; railroads and telegraph lines connected the country's disparate populations as never before. When the 1840s dawned, Americans were feeling optimistic about the future: the population was growing, economic conditions were improving, and peace had reigned for nearly thirty years. A hopeful nation looked to the West, where vast areas of unsettled land seemed to promise prosperity to anyone resourceful enough to take advantage. And yet political tensions roiled below the surface; as the country took on new lands, slavery emerged as an irreconcilable source of disagreement between North and South, and secession reared its head for the first time. This book is an account of a crucial decade that forged a young nation's character and destiny.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The westward expansion of the US during the second half of the 19th century has long held the attention of historians and history enthusiasts. Often, the works in this field fall into one of two categories: glorification or condemnation of this tumultuous process. To his credit, Woodworth (Texas Christian Univ.) does not fit in either activist-oriented category with this book. Beginning with the rise of the two-party system and concluding with the California gold rush and subsequent instant statehood, which played a significant role in expediting Southern secession and ultimately the start of the Civil War, Woodworth presents the complexities of the period in a clear order. While the elegantly crafted chapters flow in a chronological fashion, the book is divided into thematic sections. In addition to the aforementioned components, the central sections shine light on the varied experiences of the migrants on the Oregon Trail, the consequences of the US annexation of Texas, and the Mexican-American War. Although a fine example of academic scholarship, the rich narrative makes this book an inviting read for anyone interested in the topic. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. T. Maxwell-Long California State University, San Bernardino

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steven E. Woodworth was born on January 28, 1961. He received a B.A. in history from Southern Illinois University in 1982 and a Ph.D. from Rice University in 1987. He is a professor of history at Texas Christian University and an expert on the Civil War. He has written a number of books on the topic including Jefferson Davis and His Generals: The Failure of Confederate Command in the West, While God Is Marching On: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers, Nothing but Victory: The Army of the Tennessee 1861-1865, Manifest Destinies: Westward Expansion and the Civil War, and This Great Struggle: America's Civil War. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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