Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Fighting chance : the struggle over woman suffrage and Black suffrage in Reconstruction America / Faye E. Dudden.

By: Dudden, Faye E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, c2011Description: viii, 287 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780199772636 (alk. paper); 0199772630 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Women -- Suffrage -- United States -- History -- 19th century | African Americans -- Suffrage -- History -- 19th century | Women's rights -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)DDC classification: 324.6/208996073
Contents:
The age is ripe for the woman question -- Black rights, women's rights, and civil war -- The "Negro's Hour" -- The struggle for equal rights -- Kansas -- Revolutionary journalism and political opportunism -- The fight over the Fifteenth Amendment.
Summary: Discusses the falling-out between women's and African-American suffrage advocates during the Reconstruction era, examining the political culture in the United States during the nineteenth century, and describing how local Republicans sought to defeat both causes by setting the groups against each other.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JK1896 .D79 2011 (Browse shelf) Available

Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-273) and index.

The age is ripe for the woman question -- Black rights, women's rights, and civil war -- The "Negro's Hour" -- The struggle for equal rights -- Kansas -- Revolutionary journalism and political opportunism -- The fight over the Fifteenth Amendment.

Discusses the falling-out between women's and African-American suffrage advocates during the Reconstruction era, examining the political culture in the United States during the nineteenth century, and describing how local Republicans sought to defeat both causes by setting the groups against each other.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Prior to the Civil War, women's rights activists such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were also devoted to the abolitionist cause and worked collaboratively with those whose main focus was abolition to advance women's rights. When the war came, they supported the war effort and advocated for emancipation, fully believing that they had a fighting chance of achieving both abolition and universal emancipation. In this book, Dudden (history, Colgate Univ.; Serving Women: Household Service in Nineteenth-Century America) closely examines the evolution of the political activity and rhetoric of Stanton and Anthony from the antebellum years of solidarity with those who advocated for black rights to their feminist employment of racist arguments in the postwar period, when former allies broke apart over the enfranchisement of black men and a delay in enfranchisement of women. VERDICT A closer examination and a more nuanced interpretation of these shifting alliances, the economic disabilities of female reformers, and the political maneuvering than other studies have given us, this book explains, though does not apologize for, the positions of these otherwise well-regarded feminists. Likely to be a classic study, it is recommended for all readers in American studies and Reconstruction history.-Theresa McDevitt, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania Lib. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In the late 1860s, women's rights pioneers Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony embraced racist arguments for woman suffrage that contradicted years spent fighting for the overthrow of slavery. Historian Dudden's meticulous scholarship details events that led the women, in what she calls a "massive" moral failure, to oppose a Fifteenth Amendment that did not enfranchise women along with black men. New evidence reveals the fault lines of coalition politics in this formative moment of black and women's rights activism. Dudden (Colgate Univ.) reinterprets long-standing assumptions, giving greater credence to Stanton and Anthony's egalitarian, interracial organizing--notably the short-lived American Equal Rights Association's fight for an inclusive Fourteenth Amendment--which collapsed when allies withdrew critical funding. She also documents a more ambiguous role for suffragists Henry B. Blackwell and Lucy Stone. Stanton and Anthony's conviction that woman suffrage had a "fighting chance," Dudden suggests, drew them to questionable tactics and alliances intended to secure key suffrage victories before opportunities slipped away. Using newly available correspondence, newspapers, and details of little-studied resources earmarked for women's rights activism, Dudden challenges readers to take a clear-eyed view of the "founding mothers of suffrage feminism." Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. K. Frisken SUNY College at Old Westbury

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Faye E. Dudden is a Professor of History at Colgate University. Her previous books include Serving Women: Household Service in Nineteenth-Century America and Women in the American Theatre: Actresses and Audiences, 1790-1870, which won the George Freedley Memorial Prize.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.