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Nothing less than war : a new history of America's entry into World War I / Justus D. Doenecke.

By: Doenecke, Justus D.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Lexington, KY : University Press of Kentucky, [2011]Copyright date: copyright 2011Description: xii, 394 pages, [24] pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780813130026 (hardcover : acid-free paper); 0813130026 (hardcover : acid-free paper); 9780813130033 (ebook); 0813130034 (ebook).Subject(s): Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924 | World War, 1914-1918 -- United States | United States -- Politics and government -- 1913-1921 | World War, 1914-1918 -- Diplomatic history | World War, 1914-1918 -- Public opinionAdditional physical formats: Nothing less than warDDC classification: 940.3/73 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Setting the stage -- The earliest debates : August 1914-March 1915 -- In peril on the sea : February-August 1915 -- Toward the Arabic crisis : January-August 1915 -- Frustrating times : August 1915-March 1916 -- Tensions with Germany and Britain : January-September 1916 -- Preparedness debates and the presidential election : March-November 1916 -- To end a conflict : October 1916-January 1917 -- The break with Germany : January-March1917 -- And the war came : March-April 1917.
Summary: When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany. In this book, the author examines the clash of opinions over the war during this transformative period and offers a fresh perspective on America's decision to enter World War I. He reappraises the public and private diplomacy of President Woodrow Wilson and his closest advisors and explores in great depth the response of Congress to the war. He also investigates the debates that raged in the popular media and among citizen groups that sprang up across the country as the U.S. economy was threatened by European blockades and as Americans died on ships sunk by German U-boats. The decision to engage in battle ultimately belonged to Wilson, but as the author demonstrates, Wilson's choice was not made in isolation. This work provides an examination of America's internal political climate and its changing international role during the seminal period of 1914-1917.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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D619 .D64 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002129039

Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-367) and index.

Setting the stage -- The earliest debates : August 1914-March 1915 -- In peril on the sea : February-August 1915 -- Toward the Arabic crisis : January-August 1915 -- Frustrating times : August 1915-March 1916 -- Tensions with Germany and Britain : January-September 1916 -- Preparedness debates and the presidential election : March-November 1916 -- To end a conflict : October 1916-January 1917 -- The break with Germany : January-March1917 -- And the war came : March-April 1917.

When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany. In this book, the author examines the clash of opinions over the war during this transformative period and offers a fresh perspective on America's decision to enter World War I. He reappraises the public and private diplomacy of President Woodrow Wilson and his closest advisors and explores in great depth the response of Congress to the war. He also investigates the debates that raged in the popular media and among citizen groups that sprang up across the country as the U.S. economy was threatened by European blockades and as Americans died on ships sunk by German U-boats. The decision to engage in battle ultimately belonged to Wilson, but as the author demonstrates, Wilson's choice was not made in isolation. This work provides an examination of America's internal political climate and its changing international role during the seminal period of 1914-1917.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

When war erupted in Europe in 1914, U.S. public opinion was for remaining neutral. In 1917, America declared war on the Central powers and joined World War I. Doenecke (history, emeritus, New Coll. of Florida; Storm on the Horizon: The Challenge to American Intervention, 1939-1941 ) reveals the complexity of the diplomatic, political, naval, and commercial tangles with which President Wilson dealt between 1914 and 1917. The economic boom from selling supplies to both sides had jump-started a moribund economy. But the British blockaded shipments intended for the Central powers. Widely publicized episodes of German brutishness and submarine attacks in which Americans died caused U.S. public opinion to change radically in 1916, yet immigration had brought large numbers of German sympathizers to the States. Wilson's public and private diplomacy was influenced by his advisers, his own character, and the fluid and volatile political climate. VERDICT Doenecke untangles and clarifies the national debate in great detail in this dense, well-documented study. It will be of great use to serious students and researchers of the Great War but will tax casual readers.-Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The US entered the 20th century to become, over time, increasingly entangled in affairs beyond its shores and eventually burdened by wars without end. The Great War was the beginning of it all, a transition to center stage in world affairs expressed by Woodrow Wilson's internationalism. Doenecke (emer., New College of Florida; Storm on the Horizon: The Challenge to American Intervention, 1939-1941, CH, Jul'01, 38-6378) leads readers through the pitfalls of the political landscape--the pros and cons of intervention, the Wilsonian effort at neutrality, and the issues that ultimately led to the US entry into WW I. Doenecke mentions the peace movement in passing. Jane Addams (early in the 20th century referred to as a "saint") became to Theodore Roosevelt "one of the shrieking sisterhood ... poor bleeding Jane and Bull Mouse." If men full of machismo had only listened to Addams! Wilson and Roosevelt paid heavily (along with thousands of US soldiers), but TR especially so for his war drum beating. In 1931, Addams shared the Nobel Peace Prize. This good book might be supplemented with Lisa Budreau's Bodies of War: World War I and the Politics of Commemoration in America, 1919-1933 (CH, Sep'10, 48-0457). Summing Up:: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Justus D. Doenecke is professor of history at the New College of University of South Florida. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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