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Torchbearers of democracy : African American soldiers in the World War I era / Chad L. Williams.

By: Williams, Chad Louis, 1976-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010Description: xiii, 452 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780807833940 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807833940 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Participation, African American | World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans | African American soldiers -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Social conditions -- 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | Racism -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Citizenship -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 940.4/03
Contents:
Introduction -- Part I: War. Democracy at war : African Americans, citizenship, and the meanings of military service ; The "race question" : the U.S. government and the training experiences of African American soldiers ; The hell of war : African American soldiers in labor and combat ; Les soldats noir : France, Black military service, and the challenges of internationalism and diaspora -- Part II: Peace? Waging peace : the end of the war and the hope of democracy ; The war at home : African American veterans and violence in the long "red summer" ; Soldiers to "new Negroes" : African American veterans and postwar racial militancy ; Lest we forget : the war and African American soldiers in history and memory -- Epilogue.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D639.N4 W497 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002129070

Includes bibliographical references (p. 409-436) and index.

Introduction -- Part I: War. Democracy at war : African Americans, citizenship, and the meanings of military service ; The "race question" : the U.S. government and the training experiences of African American soldiers ; The hell of war : African American soldiers in labor and combat ; Les soldats noir : France, Black military service, and the challenges of internationalism and diaspora -- Part II: Peace? Waging peace : the end of the war and the hope of democracy ; The war at home : African American veterans and violence in the long "red summer" ; Soldiers to "new Negroes" : African American veterans and postwar racial militancy ; Lest we forget : the war and African American soldiers in history and memory -- Epilogue.

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CHOICE Review

"I done my part and I'm going to fight right here till Uncle Sam does his," a black veteran of WW I reflected; he was not "looking for trouble," but he would not be "dodging" trouble if it came, he added. The pride in service, the ambivalence about that service to Uncle Sam, the desire to go about his life without "trouble," and the willingness to fight in self-defense when trouble came: such was the complicated world of African American servicemen, both over here and over there during the Great War, which Williams (Hamilton College) covers in abundant detail in this indispensable book. Bits and pieces of this story may be found in a variety of other histories, but none to date have put the entire story together with the comprehensiveness, care, research, and insight of this hefty work. The politics behind the formation of the Army's segregated 92nd Infantry Division, the humiliating labor gangs at home that awaited numerous black draftees who sought glory but found instead near-slave labor, the tenuous relationship between black colonials abroad, the struggle between a racist "history" and black "memory" after the war--Williams tells all that, and much more. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. P. Harvey University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

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