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For home and country : World War I propaganda on the home front / Celia Malone Kingsbury.

By: Kingsbury, Celia Malone.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Studies in war, society, and the military: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2010]Copyright date: ©2010Description: 309 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780803224742 (cloth : alk. paper); 0803224745.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Propaganda | World War, 1914-1918 -- United States | Propaganda, American | Popular culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1914-1918 -- Social aspects | World War, 1914-1918 -- Psychological aspects | Persuasion (Psychology)DDC classification: 940.4/88
Contents:
Introduction -- Food will win the war : domestic science and the royal society -- "One hundred percent" : war service and women's fiction -- VADs and khaki girls : the ultimate reward for war service -- "Learning to hate the German beast" : children as war mongers -- The hun is at the gate : protecting the innocents -- Conclusion : learning to love big brother--or not.
Summary: World War I prompted the first massive organized propaganda campaign of the twentieth century. Posters, pamphlets, and other media spread fear about the "Hun", who was often depicted threatening American families in their homes, while additional campaigns encouraged Americans and their allies to support the war effort. With most men actively involved in warfare, women and children became a special focus and a tool of social manipulation during the war. This work examines the propaganda that targeted noncombatants on the home front in the United States and Europe during World War I. Cookbooks, popular magazines, romance novels, and government food agencies targeted women in their homes, especially their kitchens, pressuring them to change their domestic habits. Children were also taught to fear the enemy and support the war through propaganda in the form of toys, games, and books. And when women and children were not the recipients of propaganda, they were often used in propaganda to target men. By examining a diverse collection of literary texts, songs, posters, and toys, the author reveals how these pervasive materials were used to fight the war's cultural battle.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D639.P7 U63 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002129237

Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-300) and index.

Introduction -- Food will win the war : domestic science and the royal society -- "One hundred percent" : war service and women's fiction -- VADs and khaki girls : the ultimate reward for war service -- "Learning to hate the German beast" : children as war mongers -- The hun is at the gate : protecting the innocents -- Conclusion : learning to love big brother--or not.

World War I prompted the first massive organized propaganda campaign of the twentieth century. Posters, pamphlets, and other media spread fear about the "Hun", who was often depicted threatening American families in their homes, while additional campaigns encouraged Americans and their allies to support the war effort. With most men actively involved in warfare, women and children became a special focus and a tool of social manipulation during the war. This work examines the propaganda that targeted noncombatants on the home front in the United States and Europe during World War I. Cookbooks, popular magazines, romance novels, and government food agencies targeted women in their homes, especially their kitchens, pressuring them to change their domestic habits. Children were also taught to fear the enemy and support the war through propaganda in the form of toys, games, and books. And when women and children were not the recipients of propaganda, they were often used in propaganda to target men. By examining a diverse collection of literary texts, songs, posters, and toys, the author reveals how these pervasive materials were used to fight the war's cultural battle.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This work examines in compelling detail the massive amounts of propaganda--both print and visual--generated, on both sides of the Atlantic, in support of the US during WW I. Kingsbury (English, Univ. of Central Missouri; The Pecular Sanity of War, CH, Apr'03, 40-4475) focuses on the home front, but from several entirely new and intriguing perspectives. Among the topics she examines are Herbert Hoover's role as director of the United States Food Administration; how domestic science (home economy) was created and manipulated, making the domestic use of food a powerful weapon; the shaping and impact of the Germans' execution of Edith Cavell as a spy; the delineation of the Red Cross and other aspects of service staffed almost exclusively by women; and how the images and interests of children could be molded into a means of strengthening war mongering. Kingsbury writes with verve and spirit, extending the theory and impact of propaganda along new avenues of research, with interesting sociological and psychological analyses. She opens and closes the book with references to George Orwell and Bob Dylan, suggesting, of course, that the uses of propaganda and the ability to deploy it are very much present today. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. B. Adler Georgia Southwestern State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Celia Malone Kingsbury is an associate professor of English at the University of Central Missouri. She is the author of The Peculiar Sanity of War: Hysteria in the Literature of World War I .

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