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The Effects of a Community-Based Hospice Experience on Attitudes and Self Perceived Competencies of Senior Nursing Students

By: Gilliland, Irene.
Contributor(s): The University of Texas at Tyler.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Tyler, Tex. University of Texas at Tyler 2011Description: iv, 73 pages.Subject(s): End-of-life care | Dying Persons | Nurse Practitioners -- Training of | Patient and nurse | NursingOnline resources: Dissertation Dissertation note: Dissertation (PhD) - University of Texas at Tyler, 2011. Summary: Death is a universal phenomenon. Of all health professionals, the nurse is the most likely one to be present at the time of death. Although nursing curricula provide mandatory clinical experiences in labor and delivery, pediatrics, psychiatry and adult medical surgical areas, there is no mandatory requirement for a clinical experience with death. In fact, before 1999, there was not even a requirement to teach about death and dying in undergraduate nursing curricula. As a result, students (who later become nurses), feel unprepared to take care of dying patients. Because death has meanings beyond just the cessation of vital signs, students develop attitudes about death that come from their culture, religion or previous experience. Discomfort with end-of-life (EOL) comes from these attitudes as well as feeling unprepared to care for the dying patient. In order to provide competent EOL care, students need factual knowledge but they also need the opportunity to explore and evaluate attitudes that may help or hinder their nursing practice. Transformational Learning Theory (TLT) provides a framework for teaching EOL care. TLT is an adult learning theory that focuses on attitudes as an important part of the learning process. By participating in learning environments that challenge attitudes as well as teach skills, students have the opportunity to identify, reflect on and discuss their attitude with others and hear others‟ perspectives. This process may change their attitude and ultimately modify their behavior the next time they encounter a similar situation. In order to provide competent EOL care, students need opportunities to explore their attitudes about death and dying.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
UT Tyler Dissertation UT Tyler Online
Online
University Archives & Special Collections RT84.T45 G55 2011 (Browse shelf) http://hdl.handle.net/10950/51 Available

Dissertation (PhD) - University of Texas at Tyler, 2011.

Death is a universal phenomenon. Of all health professionals, the nurse is the
most likely one to be present at the time of death. Although nursing curricula provide
mandatory clinical experiences in labor and delivery, pediatrics, psychiatry and adult
medical surgical areas, there is no mandatory requirement for a clinical experience with
death. In fact, before 1999, there was not even a requirement to teach about death and
dying in undergraduate nursing curricula. As a result, students (who later become
nurses), feel unprepared to take care of dying patients.
Because death has meanings beyond just the cessation of vital signs, students
develop attitudes about death that come from their culture, religion or previous
experience. Discomfort with end-of-life (EOL) comes from these attitudes as well as
feeling unprepared to care for the dying patient. In order to provide competent EOL care, students need factual knowledge but they also need the opportunity to explore and
evaluate attitudes that may help or hinder their nursing practice. Transformational Learning Theory (TLT) provides a framework for teaching EOL
care. TLT is an adult learning theory that focuses on attitudes as an important part of the
learning process. By participating in learning environments that challenge attitudes as
well as teach skills, students have the opportunity to identify, reflect on and discuss their
attitude with others and hear others‟ perspectives. This process may change their attitude and ultimately modify their behavior the next time they encounter a similar situation. In order to provide competent EOL care, students need opportunities to explore their attitudes about death and dying.

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