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Kennedy or Nixon : does it make any difference? / by Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

By: Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. (Arthur Meier), 1917-2007.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Macmillan, 1960Description: 51 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeSubject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1953-1961 | Presidents -- United States -- Election -- 1960Additional physical formats: Online version:: Kennedy or Nixon.; Online version:: Kennedy or Nixon.DDC classification: 324.9730922 | 329.01 Other classification: MG 70690
Contents:
Their personalities -- Nixon -- Kennedy -- Their policies -- Their parties.
Summary: Every presidential campaign has its facile and fashionable clichés. The favorite cliché of 1960 is that the two candidates, John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon, are essentially the same sort of men, stamped from the same mold, committed to the same values, dedicated to the same objectives -- that they are, so to speak, the Gold Dust Twins of American politics. This cliché is reinforced by the contention that, after all, there is very little to choose between their parties either -- that the Democrats and Republicans have come to settle on much the same ground in domestic as well as foreign policy, that the bad old disagreements have pretty much passed away, and that, when the inquiring foreigner asks, "What is the difference between your two parties?" the honest American is impelled to answer, "Damn little any more." This essay is an attempt to explore these clichés. It will seek to establish that there is a considerable difference between the two candidates -- their personalities, their policies, their parties -- and that this difference may be vital to the safety and survival of our nation in the troubled years ahead.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E840 .S35 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100954866

Their personalities -- Nixon -- Kennedy -- Their policies -- Their parties.

Every presidential campaign has its facile and fashionable clichés. The favorite cliché of 1960 is that the two candidates, John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon, are essentially the same sort of men, stamped from the same mold, committed to the same values, dedicated to the same objectives -- that they are, so to speak, the Gold Dust Twins of American politics. This cliché is reinforced by the contention that, after all, there is very little to choose between their parties either -- that the Democrats and Republicans have come to settle on much the same ground in domestic as well as foreign policy, that the bad old disagreements have pretty much passed away, and that, when the inquiring foreigner asks, "What is the difference between your two parties?" the honest American is impelled to answer, "Damn little any more." This essay is an attempt to explore these clichés. It will seek to establish that there is a considerable difference between the two candidates -- their personalities, their policies, their parties -- and that this difference may be vital to the safety and survival of our nation in the troubled years ahead.

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