Normal view MARC view ISBD view

When the world ended; diary. Edited by Earl Schenck Miers.

By: LeConte, Emma.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, Oxford University Press, 1957Description: xviii, 124 p. port. 22 cm.Subject(s): Columbia (S.C.) -- History | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narratives, Confederate | LeConte, Emma -- DiariesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: When the world ended.DDC classification: 973.782
Contents:
Introduction -- The horrible picture is constantly before my mind -- What a panic the whole town is in -- We look with horror and hatred -- The abomination of desolation -- Hurrah! Old Abe Lincoln has been assassinated! -- What tyranny.
Summary: Emma was seventeen years of age when these passionate pages were written, and the war had brought her, she said, "little of the exuberant joy that people talk about as the natural heritage of youth." Four years of bitter blood-letting she reduced to a single stark sentence: "No pleasure, no enjoyment -- nothing but rigid economy and hard work -- nothing but the stern realities of life." With a power of expression far beyond the normal youth, she caught the agonizing immediacy of those months -- the fear, the courage, the sense of betrayal, the nothingness of a world torn asunder. Sherman marching into South Carolina -- with those five cruel words began the realization that the cause was lost, the dream ending, a way of life dying. - Introduction.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E577 .L4 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100954965

Introduction -- The horrible picture is constantly before my mind -- What a panic the whole town is in -- We look with horror and hatred -- The abomination of desolation -- Hurrah! Old Abe Lincoln has been assassinated! -- What tyranny.

Emma was seventeen years of age when these passionate pages were written, and the war had brought her, she said, "little of the exuberant joy that people talk about as the natural heritage of youth." Four years of bitter blood-letting she reduced to a single stark sentence: "No pleasure, no enjoyment -- nothing but rigid economy and hard work -- nothing but the stern realities of life." With a power of expression far beyond the normal youth, she caught the agonizing immediacy of those months -- the fear, the courage, the sense of betrayal, the nothingness of a world torn asunder. Sherman marching into South Carolina -- with those five cruel words began the realization that the cause was lost, the dream ending, a way of life dying. - Introduction.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.