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Translation nation : defining a new American identity in the Spanish-speaking United States / Héctor Tobar.

By: Tobar, Héctor, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Riverhead Books, 2005Description: 307 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1573223050 (alk. paper); 9781573223058 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Hispanic Americans -- Social conditions | Hispanic Americans -- Ethnic identity | United States -- Ethnic relationsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Translation nation.; Online version:: Translation nation.
Contents:
Crossings -- Americanismo : city of peasants (Los Angeles, California) -- Where green chiles roam : no es imposible (San Ysidro, California ; Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico) -- Brother citizen, brother alien : sin fronteras (Watts, California ; Ameca, Jalisco, Mexico) -- Pioneers and pilgrims -- The wanderers : el destierro (Ashland, Alabama ; McAllen, Texas ; Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico) -- In the land of the new : en la tierra de lo nuevo (Dalton, Georgia ; Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico ; Memphis, Tennessee) -- Our secret Latin heartlands : los secretos del machote (Rupert, Idaho ; Frankenmuth, Michigan ; Grand Island, Nebraska ; Liberal, Kansas) -- Manifest destinies -- Unconquered : la reconquista (Cordova, New Mexico ; San Fernando, California ; San Antonio, Texas) -- The old men and the boy : los balseros (Miami, Florida) -- Fathers, daughters, citizens, and strongwomen : el hambre y el orgullo (Barstow, Los Angeles, Bell Gardens, Maywood, Watts, and South Gate, California) -- E. pluribus unum -- Una nación unida : heroes of another fatherland (El Reno, Oklahoma ; San Juan, Puerto Rico ; New York, New York ; Baghdad, Iraq) -- Epilogue. Che and the three monkeys : che y los tres monos (La Higuera, Bolivia ; Buenos Aires, Argentina ; Los Angeles, California ; Ashland, Alabama).
Summary: Presents a collection of essays that explores the growing population of Latino-Americans in the United States, and examines the ways in which Hispanic communities are influencing American society.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184.S75 T63 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002136497

pt. 1. Crossings -- 1. Americanismo : city of peasants (Los Angeles, California) -- 2. Where green chiles roam : no es imposible (San Ysidro, California ; Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico) -- 3. Brother citizen, brother alien : sin fronteras (Watts, California ; Ameca, Jalisco, Mexico) -- pt. 2. Pioneers and pilgrims -- 4. The wanderers : el destierro (Ashland, Alabama ; McAllen, Texas ; Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico) -- 5. In the land of the new : en la tierra de lo nuevo (Dalton, Georgia ; Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico ; Memphis, Tennessee) -- 6. Our secret Latin heartlands : los secretos del machote (Rupert, Idaho ; Frankenmuth, Michigan ; Grand Island, Nebraska ; Liberal, Kansas) -- pt. 3. Manifest destinies -- 7. Unconquered : la reconquista (Cordova, New Mexico ; San Fernando, California ; San Antonio, Texas) -- 8. The old men and the boy : los balseros (Miami, Florida) -- 9. Fathers, daughters, citizens, and strongwomen : el hambre y el orgullo (Barstow, Los Angeles, Bell Gardens, Maywood, Watts, and South Gate, California) -- pt. 4. E. pluribus unum -- 10. Una nación unida : heroes of another fatherland (El Reno, Oklahoma ; San Juan, Puerto Rico ; New York, New York ; Baghdad, Iraq) -- Epilogue. Che and the three monkeys : che y los tres monos (La Higuera, Bolivia ; Buenos Aires, Argentina ; Los Angeles, California ; Ashland, Alabama).

Presents a collection of essays that explores the growing population of Latino-Americans in the United States, and examines the ways in which Hispanic communities are influencing American society.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tobar (The Tattooed Soldier), who helped cover the 1992 L.A. riots for the Los Angeles Times, skillfully goes beyond the typical barrio to demonstrate the far-reaching influences of Spanish-speaking individuals and communities in America today. Unlike his father's generation-along with most preceding waves of immigrants-Tobar and his contemporaries do not find it necessary to lose their old traditions in favor of American ones. Instead, they share a cultural identity that Tobar calls Americanismo, characterized by the ability to live in America as an American who continues to watch and listen to Spanish-language media and whose children idolize Latino sports heroes and pop stars. Tobar's informed narrative (drawn from much personal experience) is written with panache. Its readability puts it a step above Ed Morales's Living in Spanglish, a less self-assured treatment of similar themes, and its comprehensiveness offers far more than the few Latino-related chapters in Alberto Gonzalez & others' Our Voices: Essays in Culture, Ethnicity, and Communication. Recommended for all libraries.-Ellen D. Gilbert, Princeton, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Héctor Tobar was born in 1963 in Los Angeles, California. He received an M.F.A. from the University of California at Irvine and became a reporter with the Los Angeles Times in the 1980's. Along with a team of writers, he was honored with a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the L.A. riots in 1992. <p> He has written both fiction and non-fiction works. His novels include The Tattooed Soldier and The Barbarian Nurseries, which won the California Book Award Gold Medal for Fiction. His non-fiction works include Translation Nation and Deep Down Dark. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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