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The persistence of the color line : racial politics and the Obama presidency / Randall Kennedy.

By: Kennedy, Randall, 1954-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Pantheon, 2011Edition: 1st ed.Description: 322 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780307377890 (hardback); 030737789X (hardback).Subject(s): African Americans -- Politics and government | Obama, Barack | Presidents -- United States -- Election -- 2008 | Racism -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | Race awareness -- United States -- History | United States -- Race relations -- Political aspects -- History | United States -- Politics and government | United States -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 973.932092 Other classification: POL008000
Contents:
The Obama inaugural -- Obama courts black America -- Obama and white America : "why can't they all be like him?" -- The race card in the campaign of 2008 -- Reverend Wright and my father : reflections on blacks and patriotism -- The racial politics of the Sotomayor confirmation -- Addressing race "the Obama way" -- Obama and the future of American race relations.
Summary: "Timely--as the 2012 presidential election nears--and controversial for its bracing iconoclasm, The Persistence of the Color Line is the first book by a major African-American public intellectual on racial politics and the Obama presidency. Renowned for his cool reason vis--̉vis the pitfalls and clichš of racial discourse, Randall Kennedy--former clerk to late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, Harvard professor of law, and author of the New York Times bestseller Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Kennedy--gives us shrewd and keen essays on the complex relationship between "the first black president" and his African-American constituency. The Persistence of the Colorline tackles hot-button issues: the nature of racial opposition to Obama; whether Obama has any special responsibility to African-Americans; the increasing irrelevance of traditional racial politics and the consequences thereof; electoral politics and cultural chauvinism; black patriotism and its antithesis (essentialism and rebellion); differences between Obama's presentation of himself to blacks and whites and the challenges posed by the dream of a post-racial society; the far from simple symbolism of Obama as leader of the Joshua generation in a country that has elected only three black senators and two black governors. As the National Law Journal puts it: "Randall Kennedy is doing the smartest work in the area of race." Here, in The Persistence of the Color Line, Kennedy--eschewing the critical excesses of both the left and the right--offers a gimlet eyed view of Obama's triumphs and travails, his strengths and weaknesses, as they pertain to the troubled history of race in America"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E 185.615 .K376 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002146264

"Timely--as the 2012 presidential election nears--and controversial for its bracing iconoclasm, The Persistence of the Color Line is the first book by a major African-American public intellectual on racial politics and the Obama presidency. Renowned for his cool reason vis--̉vis the pitfalls and clichš of racial discourse, Randall Kennedy--former clerk to late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, Harvard professor of law, and author of the New York Times bestseller Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Kennedy--gives us shrewd and keen essays on the complex relationship between "the first black president" and his African-American constituency. The Persistence of the Colorline tackles hot-button issues: the nature of racial opposition to Obama; whether Obama has any special responsibility to African-Americans; the increasing irrelevance of traditional racial politics and the consequences thereof; electoral politics and cultural chauvinism; black patriotism and its antithesis (essentialism and rebellion); differences between Obama's presentation of himself to blacks and whites and the challenges posed by the dream of a post-racial society; the far from simple symbolism of Obama as leader of the Joshua generation in a country that has elected only three black senators and two black governors. As the National Law Journal puts it: "Randall Kennedy is doing the smartest work in the area of race." Here, in The Persistence of the Color Line, Kennedy--eschewing the critical excesses of both the left and the right--offers a gimlet eyed view of Obama's triumphs and travails, his strengths and weaknesses, as they pertain to the troubled history of race in America"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [281]-303) and index.

The Obama inaugural -- Obama courts black America -- Obama and white America : "why can't they all be like him?" -- The race card in the campaign of 2008 -- Reverend Wright and my father : reflections on blacks and patriotism -- The racial politics of the Sotomayor confirmation -- Addressing race "the Obama way" -- Obama and the future of American race relations.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Randall Kennedy is the Michael R. Klein Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He received his undergraduate degree from Princeton and his law degree from Yale. He attended Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar and is a former clerk to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. He is the author of Race, Crime, and the Law, a winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award; Interracial Intimacies: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption; Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word; and Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal. He lives in Massachusetts.</p>

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