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The cause lost : myths and realities of the Confederacy / William C. Davis.

By: Davis, William C, 1946-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Modern war studies: Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c1996Description: xi, 224 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700608095; 9780700608096; 0700612548 (pbk.); 9780700612543 (pbk.).Report number: 96014237Subject(s): Confederate States of America -- History | Confederate States of America History | GeschichteAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Cause lost.DDC classification: 973.713 Other classification: 15.85 | 15.87 | 7,26
Contents:
Jefferson Davis : the mystery of the myth -- Davis, Johnston, and Beauregard : the triple play that crippled the Confederacy -- Davis and Lee : partnership for success -- The siege of Charleston -- A different kind of war : fighting in the west -- Forgotten wars : the Confederate Trans-Mississippi -- Lost will, lost causes -- The turning point that wasn't : the Confederates and the election of 1864 -- John C. Breckinridge and Confederate defeat -- Stonewall Jackson in myth and memory -- Myths and realities of the Confederacy -- The Civil War and the Confederacy in cinema.
Summary: In these pages, Davis brings into sharp focus the facts and fictions of the South's victories and defeats, its tenacious struggle to legitimize its cause and defeat an overpowering enemy, and its ultimate loss of will. He debunks long-standing legends, offers irrefutable evidence explaining Confederate actions, and contemplates the idealism, naivete, folly, and courage of the military leadership and would-be founding fathers. Among the most misunderstood, Davis contends,Summary: was Jefferson Davis. Often branded as enigmatic and incompetent, the Confederate president was simply a decent and committed leader whose mistakes were magnified by the war's extraordinary demands. Davis scrutinizes Jefferson Davis' relationship with his generals - most of whom were unproved talents or cronies with proven deficiencies - and reveals why only Robert E. Lee succeeded in winning Davis' confidence through flattery, persuasion, and a sense of responsibility.Summary: He also examines the myths and memories of the nearly deified Stonewall Jackson and of John C. Breckinridge, the only effective Confederate secretary of war. Davis also illustrates why the cause of the war - a subject of long-standing controversy - boils down to the single issue of slavery; why Southerners, 90 percent of whom didn't own slaves, were willing to join in the battle to defend their homeland; how the personalities, tactics, and styles of the armies in the.Summary: turbulent West differed greatly from those in the East; what real or perceived turning points influenced Southern decision making; and how mythology and misinterpretations have been perpetuated through biography, history, literature, and film.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E487 .D276 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002137982

Includes bibliographical references (p. [207]-218) and index.

Jefferson Davis : the mystery of the myth -- Davis, Johnston, and Beauregard : the triple play that crippled the Confederacy -- Davis and Lee : partnership for success -- The siege of Charleston -- A different kind of war : fighting in the west -- Forgotten wars : the Confederate Trans-Mississippi -- Lost will, lost causes -- The turning point that wasn't : the Confederates and the election of 1864 -- John C. Breckinridge and Confederate defeat -- Stonewall Jackson in myth and memory -- Myths and realities of the Confederacy -- The Civil War and the Confederacy in cinema.

In these pages, Davis brings into sharp focus the facts and fictions of the South's victories and defeats, its tenacious struggle to legitimize its cause and defeat an overpowering enemy, and its ultimate loss of will. He debunks long-standing legends, offers irrefutable evidence explaining Confederate actions, and contemplates the idealism, naivete, folly, and courage of the military leadership and would-be founding fathers. Among the most misunderstood, Davis contends,

was Jefferson Davis. Often branded as enigmatic and incompetent, the Confederate president was simply a decent and committed leader whose mistakes were magnified by the war's extraordinary demands. Davis scrutinizes Jefferson Davis' relationship with his generals - most of whom were unproved talents or cronies with proven deficiencies - and reveals why only Robert E. Lee succeeded in winning Davis' confidence through flattery, persuasion, and a sense of responsibility.

He also examines the myths and memories of the nearly deified Stonewall Jackson and of John C. Breckinridge, the only effective Confederate secretary of war. Davis also illustrates why the cause of the war - a subject of long-standing controversy - boils down to the single issue of slavery; why Southerners, 90 percent of whom didn't own slaves, were willing to join in the battle to defend their homeland; how the personalities, tactics, and styles of the armies in the.

turbulent West differed greatly from those in the East; what real or perceived turning points influenced Southern decision making; and how mythology and misinterpretations have been perpetuated through biography, history, literature, and film.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In a series of essays (some previously published) dealing with various aspects of the Civil War, Davis (The American Frontier, Smithmark, 1995) provides new insights into some of the myths and realities of the war. The essays on Jefferson Davis look at his leadership and his relations with his generals, especially Robert E. Lee, while those on Stonewall Jackson and Breckenridge correct a lot of the myths that have been written since the end of the war. The author also examines the Confederate armies in the West, blaming their losses on poor leadership and lack of support from the Confederate government, and illustrates why slavery was the single issue of the war though 90 percent of the participants from the South did not own slaves. Davis helps clear away misconceptions about the Civil War and gives the reader a clearer insight into problems that affected the South. An excellent book that should be in every Civil War collection.‘W. Walter Wicker, Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston (ret.) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Civil War scholar and award-winning author, Davis has also written Breckinridge: Statesman, Soldier, Symbol (CH, Mar'75); Jefferson Davis: the Man and His Hour (1991); and A Government of Our Own (1994), on the Confederacy. No one should be more qualified than he to write on its myths and realities. Yet this book is filled with trivia and does not present a smoothly flowing history, nor does the author debunk "the lost cause," for the most part. Instead, he reveals quirks of Confederates and Yankees alike. Myths are presented without discussion as to why they remain prevalent among citizens north and south. Further, he fails to fully develop the fascinating thesis that the Confederacy would have abolished slavery, if in so doing, Confederate leaders could have achieved independence. Only for collections that seek to include all Civil War and/or Confederate history. Disappointing. N. J. Hervey Luther College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William C. Davis is the recipient of three Jefferson Davis Awards as well as the T. Harry Williams Memorial Award, Bell I. Wiley Prize, Fletcher Pratt Award, Phi Alpha Theta Award, and Harry S. Truman Award

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