The lodger : his life on Silver Street / Charles Nicholl.

By: Nicholl, CharlesMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Viking, 2008Edition: 1st American edDescription: xviii, 377 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 9780670018505; 0670018503Other title: Lodger Shakespeare [Spine title]Subject(s): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 | Dramatists, English -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- Biography | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Homes and haunts -- England -- London | Cripplegate (London, England) -- Social life and customsDDC classification: 822.3/3 | B LOC classification: PR2907 | .N53 2008
Contents:
'One Mr Shakespeare' -- Silver Street -- The Mountjoys -- Tiremaking -- Among Strangers -- Sex & the City -- Making Sure -- Appendix: The Belott-Mountjoy papers
Summary: "In 1612, Shakespeare gave evidence in a court case at Westminster - and it is the only occasion on which his actual spoken, words, were recorded. The case seems routine - a dispute over an unpaid marriage dowry - but it opens an unexpected window into the dramatist's famously obscure life story. Some eight years earlier, we learn, Shakespeare was lodging in the house of a French immigrant family, the Mountjoys, in the Cripplegate area of London. While there he was called on by his landlady to "persuade" the family's former apprentice to marry their daughter." "Charles Nicholl applies a powerful biographical magnifying glass to this fascinating but little-known episode in Shakespeare's life.Summary: Marshaling evidence from a wide variety of sources, including previously unknown documentary material on the Mountjoys, he conjures up a detailed and compelling description of the circumstances in which Shakespeare lived and worked, and in which he wrote plays such as Othello, Measure for Measure and King Lear, Nicholl also throws new light on the puzzling story of Shakespeare's collaboration with the back author and brothel keeper George Wilkins." "In this subtle and atmospheric exploration of Shakespeare at forty, we see him not from the viewpoint of literary greatness, but in the humdrum and very human context of Silver Street, where to the maid of the house he was merely "one Mr. Shakespeare," renting the room upstairs."--BOOK JACKET. (Blackwell).
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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PR2907 .N53 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001635457

Published in Great Britain as The lodger : Shakespeare on silver Street by Allen Lane, a division of Penguin Books Ltd.--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 351-362) and index.

Part 1 'One Mr Shakespeare' -- Part 2 Silver Street -- Part 3 The Mountjoys -- Part 4 Tiremaking -- Part 5 Among Strangers -- Part 6 Sex & the City -- Part 7 Making Sure -- Appendix: The Belott-Mountjoy papers 279.

"In 1612, Shakespeare gave evidence in a court case at Westminster - and it is the only occasion on which his actual spoken, words, were recorded. The case seems routine - a dispute over an unpaid marriage dowry - but it opens an unexpected window into the dramatist's famously obscure life story. Some eight years earlier, we learn, Shakespeare was lodging in the house of a French immigrant family, the Mountjoys, in the Cripplegate area of London. While there he was called on by his landlady to "persuade" the family's former apprentice to marry their daughter." "Charles Nicholl applies a powerful biographical magnifying glass to this fascinating but little-known episode in Shakespeare's life.

Marshaling evidence from a wide variety of sources, including previously unknown documentary material on the Mountjoys, he conjures up a detailed and compelling description of the circumstances in which Shakespeare lived and worked, and in which he wrote plays such as Othello, Measure for Measure and King Lear, Nicholl also throws new light on the puzzling story of Shakespeare's collaboration with the back author and brothel keeper George Wilkins." "In this subtle and atmospheric exploration of Shakespeare at forty, we see him not from the viewpoint of literary greatness, but in the humdrum and very human context of Silver Street, where to the maid of the house he was merely "one Mr. Shakespeare," renting the room upstairs."--BOOK JACKET. (Blackwell).

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