Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The time machine; an invention.

By: Wells, H. G. (Herbert George), 1866-1946.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass., R. Bentley, 1971Description: 118 p. 22 cm.ISBN: 0837604036; 9780837604039.Subject(s): Time travel -- Fiction | Science fictionDDC classification: 823/.9/12 Summary: A classic novel of the future follows the Time Traveller as he hurtles one million years into the future and encounters a world populated by two distinct races, the childlike Eloi and the disgusting Morlocks who prey on the Eloi.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR5774 .T5 1971 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100975713

A classic novel of the future follows the Time Traveller as he hurtles one million years into the future and encounters a world populated by two distinct races, the childlike Eloi and the disgusting Morlocks who prey on the Eloi.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This abridged classic is buoyed by a spirited dramatization featuring Leonard Nimoy and John de Lancie, also known, respectively, as "Spock" and "Q" to Star TrekR fans. The Time Traveler's tale of the future is a disturbing vision of the human situation as it appeared to Wells in the late 19th century. The Traveler encounters a community consisting of only two species of animals: the barbaric Morlocks and the gentle Eloi. The evolution of these two species began in industrialized England. Nimoy, as the Time Traveler, and de Lancie, as his 19th-century friend and confidant, are superb in their roles and clearly having fun with this production. The supporting crew of readers provide a robust atmosphere of doubt, debate, and incredulity. This work is part of a promising new sf series distributed by Simon & Schuster Audio. Highly recommended.‘Ray Vignovich, West Des Moines P.L., Iowa (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Wells's simple stories are surefire hits. Is time travel possible? What would it be like to be invisible? These slim versions of the classics provide both the mind-bending plots-although slightly edited, such as a twist ending in The Time Machine-and also some discussion questions and writing prompts. The artwork and paneling are slightly oversize, hinting at a younger audience, but the coloring and lettering have that familiar computer-enhanced sleekness comic readers know well by now. Because of the simplified texts and the slimness of the volumes, these titles are great choices for boosting the reading interests and skills of reluctant readers.-John Leighton, Brooklyn Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

H. G. Wells was born in Bromley, England on September 21, 1866. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a draper, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology. He graduated from London University in 1888 and became a science teacher. He also wrote for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. <p> He became an author best known for science fiction novels and comic novels. His science fiction novels include The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Wonderful Visit, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon, and The Food of the Gods. His comic novels include Love and Mr. Lewisham, Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul, The History of Mr. Polly, and Tono-Bungay. He also wrote several short story collections including The Stolen Bacillus, The Plattner Story, and Tales of Space and Time. He died on August 13, 1946 at the age of 79. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.