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Scott's shadow : the novel in Romantic Edinburgh / Ian Duncan.

By: Duncan, Ian.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Literature in history (Princeton, N.J.): Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2007ISBN: 9780691043838 (acid-free paper); 0691043833 (acid-free paper).Subject(s): Scott, Walter, Sir, 1771-1832 -- Influence | English fiction -- Scottish authors -- History and criticism | English fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Romanticism -- Scotland | Nationalism in literature | National characteristics, Scottish, in literature | Modernism (Literature) -- Scotland | Scotland -- In literature | Edinburgh (Scotland) -- Intellectual life -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 823.0099411 Other classification: HL 1080 | HL 1295 | HL 1301 | HL 4265
Contents:
Edinburgh, capital of the nineteenth century - The invention of national culture -- Economies of national character -- Modernity's other worlds -- The rise of fiction -- Hogg's body -- The upright corpse -- Theoretical histories of society -- Authenticity effects -- A new spirit of the age.
Review: "Scott's Shadow is the first comprehensive account of the flowering of Scottish fiction between 1802 and 1832, when post-Enlightenment Edinburgh rivaled London as a center for literary and cultural innovation. Ian Duncan shows how Walter Scott became the central figure in these developments, and how he helped redefine the novel as the principal modern genre for the representation of national historical life." "Duncan traces the rise of a cultural nationalist ideology and the ascendancy of Scott's Waverley novels in the years after Waterloo. He argues that the key to Scott's achievement and its unprecedented impact was the actualization of a realist aesthetic of fiction, one that offered a socializing model of the imagination as first theorized by Scottish philosopher and historian David Hume. This aesthetic, Duncan contends, provides a powerful novelistic alternative to the Kantian-Coleridgean account of the imagination that has been taken as normative for British Romanticism since the early twentieth century."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR8601 .D86 2007 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002138659

Correct ISBN from publisher's Web site.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [349]-373) and index.

Edinburgh, capital of the nineteenth century - The invention of national culture -- Economies of national character -- Modernity's other worlds -- The rise of fiction -- Hogg's body -- The upright corpse -- Theoretical histories of society -- Authenticity effects -- A new spirit of the age.

"Scott's Shadow is the first comprehensive account of the flowering of Scottish fiction between 1802 and 1832, when post-Enlightenment Edinburgh rivaled London as a center for literary and cultural innovation. Ian Duncan shows how Walter Scott became the central figure in these developments, and how he helped redefine the novel as the principal modern genre for the representation of national historical life." "Duncan traces the rise of a cultural nationalist ideology and the ascendancy of Scott's Waverley novels in the years after Waterloo. He argues that the key to Scott's achievement and its unprecedented impact was the actualization of a realist aesthetic of fiction, one that offered a socializing model of the imagination as first theorized by Scottish philosopher and historian David Hume. This aesthetic, Duncan contends, provides a powerful novelistic alternative to the Kantian-Coleridgean account of the imagination that has been taken as normative for British Romanticism since the early twentieth century."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Also author of Modern Romance and Transformations of the Novel (1992), Duncan (Univ. of California, Berkeley) offers here a complex, fascinating monograph on the Scottish novel in the age of Walter Scott. Between 1802 and 1832, Duncan argues, Edinburgh emerged--and disappeared--as London's rival in the British literary marketplace, with Scott towering over his rivals as the exemplar of Scottish literature. Duncan demonstrates that Scottish authors engaged not only with Scott as a representative author but also with the literary, historical, and formal implications of Scott's core "invention," the modern historical novel (itself grounded in Scottish Enlightenment philosophy and political economy). Although much recent work on the historical novel emphasizes its ties with historiography, Duncan claims that Scott's "investment in the rhetoric of fiction" is his most significant contribution to the genre. In addition to Scott and the Edinburgh periodicals market, Duncan examines at length John Galt, James Hogg, and Christian Johnstone; the work of the last, he contends, exemplifies the extent to which the "Scottish novel" had imploded shortly before Scott's death. Mandatory reading for scholars of 19th-century studies and the history of the novel. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. M. E. Burstein SUNY College at Brockport

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ian Duncan is professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Modern Romance and Transformations of the Novel and the coeditor of Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism .

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