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The new Jim Crow : mass incarceration in the age of colorblindness / Michelle Alexander.

By: Alexander, Michelle.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : [Jackson, Tenn.] : New Press ; Distributed by Perseus Distribution, 2010Description: xi, 290 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781595581037 (hc. : alk. paper); 1595581030 (hc. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | African American prisoners -- United States | African American men -- Social conditions | Race discrimination -- United States | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 364.973 | 323.1196
Contents:
The rebirth of caste -- The lockdown -- The color of justice -- The cruel hand -- The new Jim Crow -- The fire this time.
Summary: As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status, much like their grandparents before them, who lived under an explicit system of control.--Book jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV9950 .A437 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002140739

Includes bibliographical references ( p. [249]-279) and index.

The rebirth of caste -- The lockdown -- The color of justice -- The cruel hand -- The new Jim Crow -- The fire this time.

As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status, much like their grandparents before them, who lived under an explicit system of control.--Book jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Alexander's first book is not an academic work, but a polemic about what social justice activists have come to call mass incarceration. She argues that despite the election of Barack Obama, a racial caste system still exists that plays out by locking up African American men. Alexander (law, Ohio State) offers a clear perspective on "lockdown" in chapter 2, where she focuses on the war on drugs. She claims that the way the criminal justice system seems to work is a far cry from how it actually works. This drug "war" is more about the lack of constraints on the police. Additionally, the author implicates the US Supreme Court for turning a blind eye to the Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution. Alexander blames the civil rights movement and the call for colorblindness as a culprit in clamping down on African Americans, although at first glance, the call looked to be progressive: "far from being a worthy goal, however, colorblindness has proved catastrophic for African Americans" (p. 228). With all the work the author did researching her subject, she does not come close to producing a scholarly text. The book's advertising promises more than it delivers. Summing Up: Not recommended. E. Smith Wake Forest University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michelle Alexander is an associate professor of law at Ohio State University and holds a joint appointment at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. Formerly the director of the ACLU's Racial Justice Project in Northern California, Alexander served as a law clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun. Cornel West is the Class of 1943 University Professor, emeritus, at Princeton University and is currently Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice at Union Theological Seminary.<br>

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