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The challenge of school reform : a journalist's education in the classroom / David S. Awbrey.

By: Awbrey, David S.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2011Description: v, 139 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781607097143 (pbk. : alk. paper); 1607097141; 9781607097136 (hbk.); 1607097133 (hbk.); 9781607097150 (electronic); 160709715X (electronic).Other title: Journalist's education in the classroom [Cover title].Subject(s): Middle school teaching -- United States -- Anecdotes | Awbrey, David S | Journalists -- United States | Middle school teachers -- United States | Teacher-student relationships -- United States | Teaching -- United States | Education -- United States | Educational change -- United StatesDDC classification: 373.1102
Contents:
Why teach? Why Pipkin? -- Imagining history -- Teaching Charlemagne -- A monk's education -- Generation global -- Class matters -- Faith in history -- Courting middle schoolers -- Medieval visions -- Miseducated educators -- The hell of denial -- The stalled crusade -- People of history -- What the teacher learned.
Summary: After a career in journalism, the author became a middle-school social studies teacher in Springfield, Missouri, a typical American community that he uses as a case study to explore many of the social and academic problems facing education nationwide. This book is an account of his experiences teaching medieval and Renaissance history. What he found in the classroom should alarm all Americans: students obsessed with popular culture and disengaged from academics, teachers intellectually unprepared for the 21st-century global society, and an educational establishment focused more on protecting its own power than on ensuring that the next generation possesses the scholastic skills necessary to advance American democracy and prosperity. But he also offers hope. Citing historical precedents, including Charlemagne's lifting Europe out of the ignorance of post-Roman Empire barbarism and the 15th-century Italian Renaissance, he examines how the rediscovery of classical learning preserved Western civilization and persuasively argues that America's future hinges on a similar restoration of the liberal arts to primacy in the nation's schools. -- From publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
LB1623.5 .A95 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002142347

Why teach? Why Pipkin? -- Imagining history -- Teaching Charlemagne -- A monk's education -- Generation global -- Class matters -- Faith in history -- Courting middle schoolers -- Medieval visions -- Miseducated educators -- The hell of denial -- The stalled crusade -- People of history -- What the teacher learned.

After a career in journalism, the author became a middle-school social studies teacher in Springfield, Missouri, a typical American community that he uses as a case study to explore many of the social and academic problems facing education nationwide. This book is an account of his experiences teaching medieval and Renaissance history. What he found in the classroom should alarm all Americans: students obsessed with popular culture and disengaged from academics, teachers intellectually unprepared for the 21st-century global society, and an educational establishment focused more on protecting its own power than on ensuring that the next generation possesses the scholastic skills necessary to advance American democracy and prosperity. But he also offers hope. Citing historical precedents, including Charlemagne's lifting Europe out of the ignorance of post-Roman Empire barbarism and the 15th-century Italian Renaissance, he examines how the rediscovery of classical learning preserved Western civilization and persuasively argues that America's future hinges on a similar restoration of the liberal arts to primacy in the nation's schools. -- From publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is one of the best books on educational reform that has been published in the last ten years. Awbrey, a former journalist, decided late in life that what he really wanted to do was to become a history teacher. He earned his teaching certificate and began teaching in a middle school in Springfield, Missouri. His book details the day-to-day ordeals faced by anyone attempting to teach low-income, overstimulated, and undermotivated adolescents in subjects such as medieval Europe, Charlemagne, and the Renaissance. He comes to the conclusion early in his book that what is missing from US education is subject content, particularly the study of the liberal arts. He notes, like many other observers of education, that when all that is assessed by the high-stakes testing required by No Child Left Behind is reading and math, then all that will be taught is reading and math, thus omitting those academic subjects that more or less define what "being educated" is all about. An excellent, easy-to-read, entertaining book. It should be required reading for all school board members nationwide. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers; upper-division undergraduate students and above. J. D. Neal University of Central Missouri

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