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Charles and Emma : the Darwins' leap of faith / Deborah Heiligman.

By: Heiligman, Deborah.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Henry Holt and Co., 2009Edition: 1st ed.Description: 268 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780805087215 (alk. paper); 0805087214 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882 -- Juvenile literature | Darwin, Emma Wedgwood, 1808-1896 -- Juvenile literature | Naturalists -- England -- Biography -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 576.8/2092
Contents:
Better than a dog -- Rat catching -- Conceal your doubts -- Where doors and windows stand open -- Little Miss Slip-Slop -- The next world -- The sensation of fear -- A leap -- A busy man -- Melancholy thoughts -- A whirl of noise and motion -- Heavy baggage, blazing fires -- Definition of happiness -- Pregnant thoughts -- Little animalcules -- Down in the country -- Sudden deaths -- Barnacles and babies -- Doing custards -- A fretful child -- God only know the issue -- A dear and good child -- Against the rules -- Terrible suffering -- the origins of "The Origin." -- Dependent on each other in so complex a manner -- What the Lord hath delivered -- Feeling, not reasoning -- Such a noise -- Mere trickery -- Warmth to the end -- Happy is the man -- Unasked questions -- So much to worship -- Acknowledgments -- Family tree -- Source notes -- Selected bibligraphy -- Index.
Awards: A Junior Library Guild selection | Michael L. Printz Honor for Excellence in Young Adult Literature, 2010 | National Book Award finalist, 2009Summary: "Charles Darwin published 'The origin of species,' his revolutionary treatise on evolution, in 1859. Even today, the theory of evolution creates tension between the scientific and religious communities. This same debate raged within Darwin himself and played an important part in his marriage: Emma's faith gave Charles a lot to think about as he worked on his controversial theory. His wife's religious convictions made him rethink how the world would receive his ideas"--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
576.8 H466ch (Browse shelf) Available 0000002143170

A Junior Library Guild selection

Michael L. Printz Honor for Excellence in Young Adult Literature, 2010

National Book Award finalist, 2009

"Charles Darwin published 'The origin of species,' his revolutionary treatise on evolution, in 1859. Even today, the theory of evolution creates tension between the scientific and religious communities. This same debate raged within Darwin himself and played an important part in his marriage: Emma's faith gave Charles a lot to think about as he worked on his controversial theory. His wife's religious convictions made him rethink how the world would receive his ideas"--From publisher description.

Accelerated Reader/Renaissance Learning UG 7.6 11.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 260-262) and index.

Better than a dog -- Rat catching -- Conceal your doubts -- Where doors and windows stand open -- Little Miss Slip-Slop -- The next world -- The sensation of fear -- A leap -- A busy man -- Melancholy thoughts -- A whirl of noise and motion -- Heavy baggage, blazing fires -- Definition of happiness -- Pregnant thoughts -- Little animalcules -- Down in the country -- Sudden deaths -- Barnacles and babies -- Doing custards -- A fretful child -- God only know the issue -- A dear and good child -- Against the rules -- Terrible suffering -- the origins of "The Origin." -- Dependent on each other in so complex a manner -- What the Lord hath delivered -- Feeling, not reasoning -- Such a noise -- Mere trickery -- Warmth to the end -- Happy is the man -- Unasked questions -- So much to worship -- Acknowledgments -- Family tree -- Source notes -- Selected bibligraphy -- Index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

To marry or not to marry? This biography starts with Charles Darwin making a list of domestic pros and cons. Despite his reservations, he decided that marriage and family life were worth the risk, and so he married Emma Wedgwood, not knowing that her religious nature would call his science into question. Why It Is for Us: The Darwins' fascinating marriage of faith and reason is a very grown-up love story. Emma prays for her husband, deeply in love and yet convinced that he is putting his eternal soul at risk. For his part, Darwin finds that the bonds of matrimony he once feared would confine him instead inform his work in ways he could not have expected. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Gr 8 Up-Charles Darwin was committed to his theory that it was "evolution that drove the creation of species." He spent 20 years secretly writing in his journals, constantly refining and polishing his shocking and revolutionary ideas that transformed the world. For Darwin, his belief in natural selection, which essentially eliminated God from the picture, was constantly "percolating and demanding his attention." He praised Emma, his wife, as open-minded, unflappable, and his anchor, yet she was his religious opposite, holding firm to a belief of God as creator of all things, arguing that it was "feeling and not reasoning that drove one to prayer." Deborah Heiligman's book (Holt, 2009) is not your typical heavy-handed biography of Darwin's controversial legacy. Rather, it is a fascinating journey that features excerpts from the couple's diaries, letters, and notebooks as well as the writings of friends, relatives, and critics. It is also the story of Darwin's love of science and his love for his wife. Heiligman brilliantly explores the relationships that influenced Darwin-from his father who encouraged free thinking to his wife's strict religious pleas. Narrator Rosalyn Landor's crisp British accent and polished reading complements the author's fabulous biography. A must-have to celebrate Darwin's 200th birthday.-Cheryl Preisendorfer, Twinsburg City Schools, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Deborah Heiligman has written more than twenty books for children. She graduated from Brown University, and started her writing career working for Scholastic News Explorer , the classroom magazine, but left when she wanted to be home with her children, and then she started writing her books. She is married to Jonathan Weiner, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1994 for The Beak of the Finch .</p>

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