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Disability and the Internet : confronting a digital divide / Paul T. Jaeger.

By: Jaeger, Paul T, 1974-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Disability in society: Publisher: Boulder, Colo. : Lynne Rienner Publishers, c2012Description: x, 225 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781588268280 (hbk. : alk. paper); 1588268284 (hbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Computers and people with disabilities | Digital divideDDC classification: 362.4/0483 LOC classification: HV1569.5 | .J34 2012
Contents:
Disability in the Internet age -- The digital divide: historical and legal issues -- Barriers to online access: personal, public, and professional spheres -- Improving accessibility: technology evaluation and policy reform -- Identity and advocacy: possibilities and impacts -- Toward an inclusive Internet.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV1569.5 .J34 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002142636

Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-218) and index.

Disability in the Internet age -- The digital divide: historical and legal issues -- Barriers to online access: personal, public, and professional spheres -- Improving accessibility: technology evaluation and policy reform -- Identity and advocacy: possibilities and impacts -- Toward an inclusive Internet.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Ready? Create physical access, social access, and intellectual access or universal usability in the uses of digital technology for people with disabilities in all their rich varieties and complexities. As technology gallops ahead of the telecommunications acts for people with disabilities of 1982, 1988, and 1996, people with disabilities are left behind in a widening digital divide. Jaeger (Maryland) suggests that current laws may not be the answer, because no one governmental agency is in charge; because people with disabilities are expected to monitor and bring complaints against agencies; because when people with disabilities bring forward complaints, they often lose their complaints due to how the laws are written; and because the current laws are reactive and not proactive. The author proposes the creation of a centralized government agency, an Office of Information and Technology Accessibility, which could draft and monitor accessibility or universal usability as well as support research, innovation, and enforcement. Jaeger also outlines new methods for website evaluations, user-centered evaluations, and methods for conducting and designing accessibility evaluations. A must read. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Academics on every level. P. A. Murphy University of Toledo

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