Too big to know : rethinking knowledge now that the facts aren't the facts, experts are everywhere, and the smartest person in the room is the room / David Weinberger.

By: Weinberger, David, 1950-Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Basic Books, [2011]Copyright date: ©2011Description: xiv, 231 pages ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780465021420 (hc., alk. paper); 0465021425 (hc., alk. paper); 9780465085965 (pbk.); 0465085962 (pbk.); 0465028136 (ebook); 9780465028139 (ebook)Subject(s): Information literacy | Social change | Information technology -- Social aspects | Internet -- Social aspects | Knowledge, Sociology ofDDC classification: 303.48/33 LOC classification: HM851 | .W4297 2011Other classification: ST 515 | MS 6950
Contents:
Prologue : the crisis of knowledge -- Knowledge overload -- Bottomless knowledge -- The body of knowledge : an introduction to the rest of the book -- The expertise of clouds -- A marketplace of echoes? -- Long form, Web form -- Too much science -- Where the rubber hits the node -- Building the new infrastructure of knowledge.
Summary: We used to know how to know. We got our answers from books or experts. We'd nail down the facts and move on. But in the Internet age, knowledge has moved onto networks. There's more knowledge than ever, of course, but it's different. Topics have no boundaries, and nobody agrees on anything. Yet this is the greatest time in history to be a knowledge seeker, if you know how. In Too Big to Know, Internet philosopher David Weinberger shows how business, science, education, and the government are learning to use networked knowledge to understand more than ever and to make smarter decisions than they could when they had to rely on mere books and experts. This groundbreaking book shakes the foundations of our concept of knowledge -- from the role of facts to the value of books and the authority of experts -- providing a compelling vision of the future of knowledge in a connected world. - Publisher.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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HM851 .W4297 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002142628
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HM851 .R3633 2016 The seventh sense : HM851 .R44 2013 Infinite progress : HM851 .S5465 2008 Here comes everybody : HM851 .W4297 2011 Too big to know : HM856 .R63 2014 Origins of possession : HM901 .S74 2003 Tomorrow now : HM1025 .S63 2012 Social psychology :

Includes bibliographical references (pages 199-218) and index.

Prologue : the crisis of knowledge -- Knowledge overload -- Bottomless knowledge -- The body of knowledge : an introduction to the rest of the book -- The expertise of clouds -- A marketplace of echoes? -- Long form, Web form -- Too much science -- Where the rubber hits the node -- Building the new infrastructure of knowledge.

We used to know how to know. We got our answers from books or experts. We'd nail down the facts and move on. But in the Internet age, knowledge has moved onto networks. There's more knowledge than ever, of course, but it's different. Topics have no boundaries, and nobody agrees on anything. Yet this is the greatest time in history to be a knowledge seeker, if you know how. In Too Big to Know, Internet philosopher David Weinberger shows how business, science, education, and the government are learning to use networked knowledge to understand more than ever and to make smarter decisions than they could when they had to rely on mere books and experts. This groundbreaking book shakes the foundations of our concept of knowledge -- from the role of facts to the value of books and the authority of experts -- providing a compelling vision of the future of knowledge in a connected world. - Publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The Internet has changed how society gains information. Today's weather forecast, political commentary on U.S. relations with the Middle East, and tips for using the latest software can all be obtained in seconds through a search engine. Weinberger (senior researcher, Berkman Ctr. for the Internet & Society, Harvard Univ.; Everything Is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder) asks whether the increased availability of information has changed what most people know and whether it is changing knowledge itself. He explores the benefits and drawbacks of our thoroughly connected culture, using several examples to illustrate how the knowledge paradigm is changing-once information was sought from experts, and now it is gleaned from networks. Although Weinberger does provide some insightful answers, this book may be even more valuable as a catalyst for further discussion. VERDICT A thought-provoking work that is both reassuring and daunting, this will appeal to all readers but will be of special interest to anyone studying information technology. Recommended.-William Baer, Georgia Inst. of -Technology Lib., Atlanta (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David Weinberger is a Senior Researcher at Harvard University's Berkman Center for the Internet and Society. He is the author of Small Pieces Loosely Joined, Everything Is Miscellaneous , and a coauthor of The Cluetrain Manifesto . He lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

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