Normal view MARC view ISBD view

When gadgets betray us : the dark side of our infatuation with new technologies / Robert Vamosi.

By: Vamosi, Rob.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Basic Books, c2011Description: xviii, 222 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780465019588; 0465019587.Subject(s): Pocket computers -- Social aspects | Pocket computers -- Health aspects | Pocket computers -- Security measures | Software failures -- Risk assessment | Computer crimesDDC classification: 004.167 Other classification: TEC052000
Contents:
A false sense of security -- The dark side of convenience -- Invisible threats -- Electronic bread crumbs -- Me, I'm not -- The myth of fingerprints -- Zeroes and ones.
Summary: Looks at the important issues that are often overlooked in the race to find the best, fastest, and most cutting-edge technological wonders.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
QA76.9 .C66 V36 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002142560

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A false sense of security -- The dark side of convenience -- Invisible threats -- Electronic bread crumbs -- Me, I'm not -- The myth of fingerprints -- Zeroes and ones.

Looks at the important issues that are often overlooked in the race to find the best, fastest, and most cutting-edge technological wonders.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Security has become a more prevalent theme in our lives as the quantity of technology in our world continues to increase. You'd think the tech folks would be able to secure the data held in various devices we use daily, but Vamosi, IT security analyst and contributing editor to PCWORLD, strongly and meticulously suggests otherwise. He exposes a technology-development landscape chock-full of inadequately guarded data and programming. New, unforeseen privacy incursions are the norm, not the exception, with many new technology deployments. The security promised by marketing and PR campaigns is nothing more than spin, argues Vamosi. The book reviews ATMs, GPS, smart electricity meters, RFID-tagged systems, electronic road tolling, embedded computer systems in cars, contactless payment systems, mobile banking, online photo sharing, retail reward programs, parking meters, smart transit card systems, and various biometric identification technologies to support arguments that security issues continue to plague our society long after one would expect. VERDICT Read this, and you'll never again ignore the default security settings on accounts or your devices again. Gadget geeks and lay readers would benefit from Vamosi's information.-James A. Buczynski, Seneca Coll. of Applied Arts & Technology, Toronto (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Vamosi (senior analyst, Mocana; contributing editor, PCWorld) writes regularly about computer security issues. Here he addresses an often-overlooked concern: the privacy and safety of the computerized devices on which people increasingly rely in all realms of everyday life. As microprocessors and data storage become cheaper, more of the items people use daily are becoming computerized or computer enhanced; however, there is a trade-off between convenience and security. Vamosi writes in an engaging style throughout the book. From the very first pages, which illustrate the faith people place in GPS devices (updated or not) and how dangerous such reliance can be, the book raises awareness of the downside of the implicit trust in mobile devices. Chapters cover such items as the amount of unprotected privacy data stored on mobile phones, the capability of cars to record driving habits (as shown in the recent investigation of Toyota), and the potential for eavesdropping that current connection protocols in smart phones and netbooks allow. The well-written work is valuable for all aficionados and users of modern gadgets and devices; it is an entertaining, highly informative read. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, lower-division undergraduates, and professionals. T. D. Richardson South University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Vamosi is a senior analyst with the Mocana Corporation, a device security start up. He is also a contributing editor at PCWorld and a security blogger for Forbes.com. He lives in northern California.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.