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Nomad : from Islam to America--a personal journey through the clash of civilizations / Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

By: Hirsi Ali, Ayaan, 1969-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Free Press, 2010Edition: 1st Free Press hardcover ed.Description: xxi, 277 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781439157312; 9781439157329 (pbk.); 1439157324 (pbk.); 1439157316.Subject(s): Hirsi Ali, Ayaan, 1969- | Somalis -- United States -- Biography | Muslim women -- United States -- Biography | Women social reformers -- Biography | Somalis -- Netherlands -- Biography | Women refugees -- Netherlands -- Biography | Netherlands. Staten-Generaal -- Biography | Muslim women -- Civil rights -- Europe | Muslim women -- Civil rights | Islam -- Social aspectsDDC classification: 305.89/354073 | B
Contents:
pt. 1. A problem family -- My father -- My half sister -- My mother -- My brother's story -- My brother's son -- My cousins -- Letter to my grandmother -- pt. 2. Nomad again -- Nomad again -- America -- Islam in America -- pt. 3. Sex, money, violence -- School and sexuality -- Money and responsibility -- Violence and the closing of the Muslim mind -- pt. 4. Remedies -- Opening the Muslim mind : an enlightenment project -- Dishonor, death, and feminists -- Seeking God but finding Allah -- Conclusion: The Miyé and the Magaalo -- Epilogue: Letter to my unborn daughter -- The AHA Foundation.
Summary: Hirsi Ali tells of coming to America to build a new life, an ocean away from the death threats made to her by European Islamists, the strife she witnessed, and the inner conflict she suffered. She calls on key institutions of the West--including universities, the feminist movement, and the Christian churches--to enact specific, innovative remedies that would help other Muslim immigrants to overcome the challenges she has experienced and to resist the fatal allure of fundamentalism and terrorism.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184.S67 H57 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002142321

pt. 1. A problem family -- My father -- My half sister -- My mother -- My brother's story -- My brother's son -- My cousins -- Letter to my grandmother -- pt. 2. Nomad again -- Nomad again -- America -- Islam in America -- pt. 3. Sex, money, violence -- School and sexuality -- Money and responsibility -- Violence and the closing of the Muslim mind -- pt. 4. Remedies -- Opening the Muslim mind : an enlightenment project -- Dishonor, death, and feminists -- Seeking God but finding Allah -- Conclusion: The Miyé and the Magaalo -- Epilogue: Letter to my unborn daughter -- The AHA Foundation.

Hirsi Ali tells of coming to America to build a new life, an ocean away from the death threats made to her by European Islamists, the strife she witnessed, and the inner conflict she suffered. She calls on key institutions of the West--including universities, the feminist movement, and the Christian churches--to enact specific, innovative remedies that would help other Muslim immigrants to overcome the challenges she has experienced and to resist the fatal allure of fundamentalism and terrorism.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

A charismatic public figure and the author of a previous memoir-the best-selling Infidel about her Muslim Somali upbringing and her second life as a refugee in the Netherlands-Ali is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank. She presents her second memoir with the explicit ideological motive to counter what she sees as naive liberal responses to Islam, but she dedicates a large portion to her struggles with culture shock as she seeks to find her footing first in Europe then the United States. The book's emotional power lies in her efforts toward a personal reckoning with her family. Those who accept Samuel P. Huntington's theory of the "clash of civilizations" will welcome this smoothly written, emotionally vivid memoir. Readers willing to accept that there is such a thing as "the Muslim mind" will take Ali's arguments at face value. Many readers, however, will reject her assertion that all Muslims think and behave as her tribal community does. Others will question her view that Islam is to be blamed for the social and political problems in predominantly Muslim third world regions and will ask how she would explain similar problems in non-Muslim countries. VERDICT A controversial book accessible to the general public, unlikely to change any minds.-Lisa Klopfer, Eastern Michigan Univ. Lib., Ypsilanti (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ayaan Hirsi Ali was born in Somalia and raised a Muslim. She grew up in Africa and Saudi Arabia before seeking asylum in 1992 in the Netherlands, where she went from cleaning factories to winning a seat in the Dutch Parliament. She is a speaker, journalist, and founder of the AHA Foundation. She has written several books including Infidel, Nomad, The Caged Virgin, and Heretic: Why Islam Needs a Reformation Now. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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