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Captives and countrymen : Barbary slavery and the American public, 1785-1816 / Lawrence A. Peskin.

By: Peskin, Lawrence A, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009ISBN: 0801891396 : HRD.Subject(s): Slavery -- Africa, North -- History | Slave trade -- Africa, North -- History | Captivity narratives -- Africa, North | Public opinion -- United StatesDDC classification: 306.3/620961
Contents:
Captivity and communications -- The captives write home -- Publicity and secrecy -- Slavery at home and abroad -- Captive nation : Algiers and independence -- The navy and the call to arms -- Masculinity and servility in Tripoli -- Between colony and empire -- Beyond captivity : the wars of 1812 -- Conclusion: Captivity and globalization.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HT1345 .P47 2009 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002141836

Includes bibliographical references (p. [219]-250) and index.

Captivity and communications -- The captives write home -- Publicity and secrecy -- Slavery at home and abroad -- Captive nation : Algiers and independence -- The navy and the call to arms -- Masculinity and servility in Tripoli -- Between colony and empire -- Beyond captivity : the wars of 1812 -- Conclusion: Captivity and globalization.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Using contemporary newspaper accounts about, and letters from, US seamen held captive on the Barbary Coast, Peskin (Morgan State Univ.) creates a study of the formation of US public opinion and the growth of national consciousness. This is not a "history" of the events, or of foreign policy, but rather a case study of communications theory. Twenty-one US sailors were seized off Algiers in 1785, another 100 in 1793. Their extended enslavement exposed the weakness of the new nation, ultimately resulting in the ratification of the Constitution, the creation of a navy, and the development of a global foreign policy. An analysis of "captivity literature" and of the broader field of "American Orientalist literature" shows how ideas and issues can develop into widespread public opinion leading to public action. In this case, it led to the exploits of Stephen Decatur and the War of 1812. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. T. Brown formerly, Westfield State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Lawrence A. Peskin is an associate professor of history at Morgan State University. He is the author of Manufacturing Revolution: The Intellectual Origins of Early American Industry , also published by Johns Hopkins.</p>

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