Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The madman's middle way : reflections on reality of the Tibetan monk Gendun Chopel / Donald S. Lopez, Jr.

By: Lopez, Donald S, 1952-.
Contributor(s): Dge-ʼdun-chos-ʼphel, A-mdo, 1903-1951. Dbu maʼi zab gnad sñiṅ por dril baʼi legs bśad klu sgrub dgoṅs rgyan. English.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Buddhism and modernity: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2006Description: xiv, 258 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0226493164 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780226493169 (hardcover : alk. paper).Subject(s): Dge-ʼdun-chos-ʼphel, A-mdo, 1903-1951. Dbu maʼi zab gnad sñiṅ por dril baʼi legs bśad klu sgrub dgoṅs rgyan | Mādhyamika (Buddhism)DDC classification: 294.3/923/092 | B Other classification: 11.93
Contents:
The life -- The text -- The commentary -- The author -- The critics -- The question of modernity.
Review: "Gendun Chopel is considered the most important Tibetan intellectual of the twentieth century. His life spanned the two defining moments in modern Tibetan history: the entry into Lhasa by British troops in 1904 and by Chinese troops in 1951. Recognized as an incarnate lama while he was a child, Gendun Chopel excelled in the traditional monastic curriculum and went on to become expert in fields as diverse as philosophy, history, linguistics, geography, and tantric Buddhism. Near the end of his life, before he was persecuted and imprisoned by the government of the young Dalai Lama, he would dictate the Adornment for Nagarjuna's Thought, a work on Madhyamaka, or "Middle Way," philosophy. It sparked controversy immediately upon its publication and continues to do so today." "The Madman's Middle Way presents the first English translation of this major Tibetan Buddhist work, accompanied by an essay on Gendun Chopel's life liberally interspersed with passages from his writings. Donald S. Lopez Jr. also provides a commentary that sheds light on the doctrinal context of the Adornment and summarizes its key arguments. Ultimately, Lopez examines the long-standing debate over whether Gendun Chopel in fact is the author of the Adornment; the heated critical response to the work by Tibetan monks of the Dalai Lama's sect; and what the Adornment tells us about Tibetan Buddhism's encounter with modernity. The result is an insightful glimpse into a provocative and enigmatic work that will be of great interest to anyone seriously interested in Buddhism or Asian religions."--Jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BQ7455 .D483 L67 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002143808
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
BQ4136 .M613 1987 Basic Buddhist concepts / BQ4570.P76 K35 1987 The principles of Buddhist psychology / BQ6160.T42 P462 Buddhist monk, Buddhist layman; BQ7455 .D483 L67 2006 The madman's middle way : BQ7662 .B783 2000 Dzogchen : BQ8149 .H787 W74 2004 The Silk Road journey with Xuanzang / BQ8349.N573 E5 1990 Selected writings of Nichiren /

Includes English translation of Tibetan text.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Gendun Chopel is considered the most important Tibetan intellectual of the twentieth century. His life spanned the two defining moments in modern Tibetan history: the entry into Lhasa by British troops in 1904 and by Chinese troops in 1951. Recognized as an incarnate lama while he was a child, Gendun Chopel excelled in the traditional monastic curriculum and went on to become expert in fields as diverse as philosophy, history, linguistics, geography, and tantric Buddhism. Near the end of his life, before he was persecuted and imprisoned by the government of the young Dalai Lama, he would dictate the Adornment for Nagarjuna's Thought, a work on Madhyamaka, or "Middle Way," philosophy. It sparked controversy immediately upon its publication and continues to do so today." "The Madman's Middle Way presents the first English translation of this major Tibetan Buddhist work, accompanied by an essay on Gendun Chopel's life liberally interspersed with passages from his writings. Donald S. Lopez Jr. also provides a commentary that sheds light on the doctrinal context of the Adornment and summarizes its key arguments. Ultimately, Lopez examines the long-standing debate over whether Gendun Chopel in fact is the author of the Adornment; the heated critical response to the work by Tibetan monks of the Dalai Lama's sect; and what the Adornment tells us about Tibetan Buddhism's encounter with modernity. The result is an insightful glimpse into a provocative and enigmatic work that will be of great interest to anyone seriously interested in Buddhism or Asian religions."--Jacket.

Translated from the Tibetan.

The life -- The text -- The commentary -- The author -- The critics -- The question of modernity.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lopez (Univ. of Michigan) has produced a fascinating study and translation of an unconventional work of Madhyamaka philosophy composed by a 20th-century Tibetan intellectual, Gendun Chopel. It begins with a concise account of his intriguing life story. Trained as a Geluk monk, Gendun Chopel returned to lay life and lived for years in cultural exile in colonial South Asia. A liminal figure, his work on Madhyamaka philosophy is also liminal. Rooted in his study at Geluk monasteries, the work diverges considerably from the traditional Geluk approach. It is an unusual work of skeptical Buddhist philosophy, one which is cognizant of diverse religious perspectives and which questions the very possibility of certain knowledge. As a product of the Tibetan encounter with modernity, it is a landmark work in Tibetan cultural history. Lopez presents this challenging work in a very clear fashion and also provides a rich commentary. The book concludes with a discussion of the controversies this work inspired. It should be required reading for specialists and graduate students in Buddhist studies and Tibetan studies. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. D. B. Gray Santa Clara University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Donald S. Lopez Jr. is the Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan. His books include Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism under Colonialism ; Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West; and Critical Terms for the Study of Buddhism , all published by the University of Chicago Press.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.