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When media goes to war : hegemonic discourse, public opinion, and the limits of dissent / by Anthony DiMaggio.

By: Dimaggio, Anthony R, 1980-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Monthly Review Press, 2010Description: 384 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781583671993 (pbk.); 1583671994 (pbk.); 9781583672006 (cloth); 1583672001 (cloth).Subject(s): Mass media and war -- United States | Mass media -- Objectivity -- United States | Mass media and propaganda -- United States | Iraq War, 2003-2011 -- Mass media and the war | Iraq War, 2003-2011 -- Propaganda | Public opinion -- United StatesDDC classification: 070.4/49355020973 Other classification: 05.30
Contents:
Introduction: propaganda and the news in a time of terror -- Withdrawal pains: Iraq and the politics of media deference -- There are no protestors here: media marginalizaition and the antiwar movement -- Worthy and unworthy victims of history: the politicization of genocide and human rights in U.S. foreign policy -- Journalistic norms and propaganda: Iraq and the war on terror -- Iran, nuclear weapons, and the politics of fear -- Media, globalization, and violence: views from around the world -- Public rationality, political elitism, and opposition to war -- Media effects on public opinion: propaganda, indoctrination, and mass resistance -- Propaganda, celebrity gossip, and the decline of news -- Postscript: media coverage in the age of Obama.
Summary: In this fresh and provocative book, Anthony DiMaggio uses the war in Iraq and the United States confrontations with Iran as his touchstones to probe the sometimes fine line between news and propaganda. Using Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony and drawing upon the seminal works of Noam Chomsky, Edward Herman, and Robert McChesney, DiMaggio combines a rigorousempirical analysis and clear, lucid prose to enlighten readers about issues essential to the struggle for a critical media and a functioning democracy. If, as DiMaggio shows, our newspapers and television news programs play a decisive role in determining what we think, and if, as he demonstrates convincingly, what the media give us is largely propaganda that supports an oppressive and undemocratic status quo, then it is incumbent upon us to make sure that they are responsive to the majority and not just the powerful and privileged few.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
P96.W352 D56 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002144681

Includes bibliographical references (p. [309]-318) and index.

Introduction: propaganda and the news in a time of terror -- Withdrawal pains: Iraq and the politics of media deference -- There are no protestors here: media marginalizaition and the antiwar movement -- Worthy and unworthy victims of history: the politicization of genocide and human rights in U.S. foreign policy -- Journalistic norms and propaganda: Iraq and the war on terror -- Iran, nuclear weapons, and the politics of fear -- Media, globalization, and violence: views from around the world -- Public rationality, political elitism, and opposition to war -- Media effects on public opinion: propaganda, indoctrination, and mass resistance -- Propaganda, celebrity gossip, and the decline of news -- Postscript: media coverage in the age of Obama.

In this fresh and provocative book, Anthony DiMaggio uses the war in Iraq and the United States confrontations with Iran as his touchstones to probe the sometimes fine line between news and propaganda. Using Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony and drawing upon the seminal works of Noam Chomsky, Edward Herman, and Robert McChesney, DiMaggio combines a rigorousempirical analysis and clear, lucid prose to enlighten readers about issues essential to the struggle for a critical media and a functioning democracy. If, as DiMaggio shows, our newspapers and television news programs play a decisive role in determining what we think, and if, as he demonstrates convincingly, what the media give us is largely propaganda that supports an oppressive and undemocratic status quo, then it is incumbent upon us to make sure that they are responsive to the majority and not just the powerful and privileged few.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anthony DiMaggio teaches American Government and International Relations at Illinois State University in the department of politics and government. He publishes regularly in Z Magazine and Counter Punch, and is the author of Mass Media, Mass Propaganda: Examining American News in the "War on Terror."

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