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Why Plato wrote / Danielle S. Allen.

By: Allen, Danielle S, 1971-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Blackwell Bristol lectures on Greece, Rome and the classical tradition: Publisher: Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010Description: xii, 232 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781444334487 (hardback); 1444334484 (hardback).Subject(s): Plato | Authorship -- Psychological aspectsDDC classification: 184
Contents:
Prologue: Why think about Plato? -- Part I: Why Plato Wrote: Chapter 1: Who was Plato?; Chapter 2: The importance of symbols to human life; Chapter 3: The philosopher as model-maker; Chapter 4: The philosopher as shadow-maker; Chapter 5: What Plato wrote; Chapter 6: How Plato lived. -- Part II: What Plato did: Chapter 7: The case for influence; Chapter 8: Culture war emergent; Chapter 9: Culture war concluded -- Epilogue: and to my colleagues -- Appendix 1: The relationship between paradigms and forms -- Appendix 2: A second tri-partite division of the soul? -- Appendix 3: Miso- compounds in greek literature.
Summary: "Why Plato Wrote is the first book to be published in the prestigious Blackwell Bristol Lecture Series in Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition. In this thought-provoking text Danielle Allen eloquently argues that Plato wrote to change Athenian culture and thereby transform Athenian politics. She makes the case that Plato was not only the world's first systematic political philosopher, but also the western world's first think-tank activist and message man. Allen contends that the roles of philosopher and message man were not mutually exclusive, and that Plato's pursuit of language as a vehicle for affecting cultural norms was grounded in his philosophy of language. Why Plato Wrote is a lucid and engaging commentary on Plato's philosophy of language and its relation to his political theory"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
B395 .A53 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002143469
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
B386.A5 C6 Plato's theory of knowledge. B386.A5 C6 1973 Plato's theory of knowledge : B393 .T38 1971 Plato. B395 .A53 2010 Why Plato wrote / B395 .B76 1967 Platos Gespräche. B395 .B772 1989 Platonic studies of Greek philosophy : B395 .C8 Therapeia: Plato's conception of philosophy.

"Why Plato Wrote is the first book to be published in the prestigious Blackwell Bristol Lecture Series in Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition. In this thought-provoking text Danielle Allen eloquently argues that Plato wrote to change Athenian culture and thereby transform Athenian politics. She makes the case that Plato was not only the world's first systematic political philosopher, but also the western world's first think-tank activist and message man. Allen contends that the roles of philosopher and message man were not mutually exclusive, and that Plato's pursuit of language as a vehicle for affecting cultural norms was grounded in his philosophy of language. Why Plato Wrote is a lucid and engaging commentary on Plato's philosophy of language and its relation to his political theory"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 161-217) and index.

Prologue: Why think about Plato? -- Part I: Why Plato Wrote: Chapter 1: Who was Plato?; Chapter 2: The importance of symbols to human life; Chapter 3: The philosopher as model-maker; Chapter 4: The philosopher as shadow-maker; Chapter 5: What Plato wrote; Chapter 6: How Plato lived. -- Part II: What Plato did: Chapter 7: The case for influence; Chapter 8: Culture war emergent; Chapter 9: Culture war concluded -- Epilogue: and to my colleagues -- Appendix 1: The relationship between paradigms and forms -- Appendix 2: A second tri-partite division of the soul? -- Appendix 3: Miso- compounds in greek literature.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this intriguing book, Allen (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton) argues that Plato wrote philosophical dialogues in order to consciously influence the political and social landscape of his contemporary Athens through the power of philosophical language. She claims that, for Plato, philosophy was not an activity standing apart from pragmatic politics but one that directly engaged the formation of values, norms, and interests for all citizens--not just the elite--through the vivid and energetic use of "surpluses of linguistic power." Allen establishes her case most compellingly through a very detailed examination of examples of oratorical debate and implementation of legal structures within the political councils of democratic Athens between 350-330 BCE. These examples reveal the implantation of Platonic concepts and ideologies through the power of Plato's philosophical language. This extraordinary and scholarly book takes a fascinating new look at Plato as politikos. It is a joy to read. Excellent notes, bibliography, and index. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. P. A. Streveler emeritus, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Danielle S. Allen is UPS Foundation Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. She is the author of The World of Prometheus: The Politics of Punishing in Democratic Athens (2000) and Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship Since Brown vs. the Board of Education ( 2004).

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