Ruin nation : destruction and the American Civil War / Megan Kate Nelson.

By: Nelson, Megan Kate, 1972-Material type: TextTextSeries: Uncivil wars: Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2012Description: xvii, 332 p. : ill. ; 23 cmISBN: 9780820333977 (cloth : alk. paper); 0820333972 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780820342511 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0820342513 (pbk. : alk. paper)Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Destruction and pillage | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Psychological aspects | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Casualties | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- InfluenceDDC classification: 973.7 LOC classification: E468.9 | .N45 2012
Contents:
Introduction. American ruins -- Our own Pompeii: ruined cities -- Lone chimneys: domestic ruins -- Battle logs: ruined forests -- Empty sleeves and government legs: the ruins of men -- Conclusion. The ruins of history.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E468.9 .N45 2012 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002144376

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction. American ruins -- Our own Pompeii: ruined cities -- Lone chimneys: domestic ruins -- Battle logs: ruined forests -- Empty sleeves and government legs: the ruins of men -- Conclusion. The ruins of history.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nelson (history and literature, Yale) claims that this "is the first book to consider the evocative power of wartime ruination as an imagined state, an act of destruction, and a process of change." This "cultural study of war and all that it both creates and destroys" focuses on the burning of urban and rural buildings, decimating southern woodlands, and maiming soldiers. Her stated high goals often prove hard for the author to develop. The clash of cultures between the Confederate South and the Unionist North produced largely predictable "imagined" responses to the physical destruction of plantation, town, and city buildings. Furthermore, decimation of native forests had been rather standard from the initial European invasion of North America. However, how the two broad cultures, Southern and Northern, understood the maimed veterans in their midst offers Nelson a new canvas on which she fruitfully explores the imagined and physical state of those with, or associated with, ruined bodies. Although her treatment of Union amputees is much fuller than that of Confederate ones, both cases resonate with the present, when wars utilizing advances in military tactics and in medicine are producing a host of veterans with broken bodies. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. J. L. Cooper emeritus, DePauw University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MEGAN KATE NELSON is a writer, historian, and cultural critic. Based in Lincoln, Massachusetts, she has written about Civil War and western history for a number of national publications. Nelson also writes a regular column on Civil War popular culture, ?Stereoscope,? for Civil War Monitor , and her blog, Historista examines the ?surprising and weird ways that people engage with history in everyday life.' Nelson is also the author of Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War (Georgia). She has taught at Texas Tech University; California State University, Fullerton; Harvard University; and Brown University.

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