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First into Nagasaki : the censored eyewitness dispatches on post-atomic Japan and its prisoners of war / George Weller ; edited with an essay by Anthony Weller ; foreward by Walter Cronkite.

By: Weller, George, 1907-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Crown Publishers, c2006Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 320, [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0307342018; 9780307342010.Subject(s): Nagasaki-shi (Japan) -- History -- Bombardment, 1945 | Prisoners of war -- United States | Prisoners of war -- JapanAdditional physical formats: Online version:: First into Nagasaki.
Contents:
First into Nagasaki (1966) -- Early dispatches (September 6-9, 1945) -- Among the POWs (September 10-20, 1945) -- Return to Nagasaki (September 20-25, 1945) -- The two Robinson Crusoes of Wake Island (September, 1945) -- The death cruise : seven weeks in hell (September-October 1945) -- The Weller dispatches by Anthony Weller (2005)
Summary: Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Weller covered World War II across Europe, Africa, and Asia. At war's end, correspondents were forbidden to enter Nagasaki and Hiroshima, but Weller, presenting himself as a U.S. colonel, set out to explore the devastation. As Nagasaki's first outside observer, he witnessed the bomb's effects. He interviewed doctors trying to cure those dying mysteriously from "Disease X." He sent his forbidden dispatches back to MacArthur's censors, assuming their importance would make them unstoppable. He was wrong: the U.S. government censored every word, and the dispatches vanished from history. Weller also became the first to enter nearby POW camps. He gathered accounts from hundreds of Allied prisoners--but those too were silenced. Weller died in 2002, believing it all lost forever. Months later, his son found a fragile copy in a crate of moldy papers. This historic body of work has never been published.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D767.25.N3 W45 2006 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002165256
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
D767.25.H6 H4 1946A Hiroshima / D767.25.H6 L4 Death in life; D767.25.N3 M35 Nagasaki; the necessary bomb? D767.25.N3 W45 2006 First into Nagasaki : D767.4 .B38 MacArthur and Wainwright; D767.4 .B4 Corregidor : D767.4 .B76 South to Bataan, north to Mukden;

Includes bibliographical references.

First into Nagasaki (1966) -- Early dispatches (September 6-9, 1945) -- Among the POWs (September 10-20, 1945) -- Return to Nagasaki (September 20-25, 1945) -- The two Robinson Crusoes of Wake Island (September, 1945) -- The death cruise : seven weeks in hell (September-October 1945) -- The Weller dispatches by Anthony Weller (2005)

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Weller covered World War II across Europe, Africa, and Asia. At war's end, correspondents were forbidden to enter Nagasaki and Hiroshima, but Weller, presenting himself as a U.S. colonel, set out to explore the devastation. As Nagasaki's first outside observer, he witnessed the bomb's effects. He interviewed doctors trying to cure those dying mysteriously from "Disease X." He sent his forbidden dispatches back to MacArthur's censors, assuming their importance would make them unstoppable. He was wrong: the U.S. government censored every word, and the dispatches vanished from history. Weller also became the first to enter nearby POW camps. He gathered accounts from hundreds of Allied prisoners--but those too were silenced. Weller died in 2002, believing it all lost forever. Months later, his son found a fragile copy in a crate of moldy papers. This historic body of work has never been published.--From publisher description.

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Library Journal Review

Weller, a Pulitzer Prize-winning war correspondent, was present with Gen. Douglas MacArthur at the Japanese surrender after the bombing of Nagasaki. He managed to elude his military minders to roam freely about Japan in the weeks that followed. He sent out a number of articles on the devastation and the efforts by the Japanese to deal with radiation sickness. But he also went into POW camps in Japan and documented the horrific torture, starvation, and general mistreatment of Allied prisoners. Most of the dispatches never passed the censor; others were killed by Weller's editors at the Chicago Daily News. MacArthur's staff eventually caught up with Weller and summarily expelled him from the theater. When he died in 2002, he thought that his original dispatches were long lost, but his son found the carbons copies. By their nature, the items are mostly short and occasionally repetitive, as witnesses give one-line reactions to the first atomic bombs. The POW dispatches, particularly one long one on the disastrous transport of prisoners from Manila to Japan, are harrowing and were regarded as too inflammatory for American eyes. Taken together, these writings form an absorbing contemporary view of post-surrender Japan. There is also a lengthy essay by Weller's son. An essential purchase for subject collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 4/15/06.]-Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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