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A quiet revolution : the veil's resurgence, from the Middle East to America / Leila Ahmed.

By: Ahmed, Leila.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2011]Copyright date: ©2011Description: viii, 352 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780300170955 (cloth : alk. paper); 0300170955 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780300181432 (pbk.); 0300181434 (pbk.).Other title: Veil's resurgence, from the Middle East to America.Subject(s): Hijab (Islamic clothing) -- Middle East | Hijab (Islamic clothing) -- United States | Veils -- Middle East | Veils -- United States | Muslim women -- Clothing -- Middle East | Muslim women -- Clothing -- United States | Muslim women -- Middle East -- Social conditions | Muslim women -- United States -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 297.5/76
Contents:
The islamic resurgence and the veil: from emergence to migration. Unveiling -- The veil's vanishing past -- The 1970s : seeds of the resurgence -- The new veil : converging influences -- The 1980s : exploring women's motivations -- Islamist connections -- Migrations -- The 1990s : a changing climate in America -- After 9/11 : new pathways in America. Prologue -- Backlash : the veil, the burkah, and the clamor of war -- Isna and the women of isna -- American Muslim women's activism in the twenty-first century.
Summary: In Cairo in the 1940s, Leila Ahmed was raised by a generation of women who never dressed in the veils and headscarves their mothers and grandmothers had worn. To them, these coverings seemed irrelevant to both modern life and Islamic piety. Today, however, the majority of Muslim women throughout the Islamic world again wear the veil. Why, Ahmed asks, did this change take root so swiftly, and what does this shift mean for women, Islam, and the West? When she began her study, Ahmed assumed that the veil's return indicated a backward step for Muslim women worldwide. What she discovered, however, in the stories of British colonial officials, young Muslim feminists, Arab nationalists, pious Islamic daughters, American Muslim immigrants, violent jihadists, and peaceful Islamic activists, confounded her expectations. Ahmed observed that Islamism, with its commitments to activism in the service of the poor and in pursuit of social justice, is the strain of Islam most easily and naturally merging with western democracies' own tradition of activism in the cause of justice and social change. It is often Islamists, even more than secular Muslims, who are at the forefront of such contemporary activist struggles as civil rights and women's rights. Ahmed's surprising conclusions represent a near reversal of her thinking on this topic. Richly insightful, intricately drawn, and passionately argued, this absorbing story of the veil's resurgence, from Egypt through Saudi Arabia and into the West, suggests a dramatically new portrait of contemporary Islam.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BP190.5.H44 A46 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002144830
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
BP189.65 .M87 A22 2002 The female voice in Sufi ritual : BP189 .J35 2006 Tales from Rumi : BP190.5.C6 T37 2010 Visibly Muslim : BP190.5.H44 A46 2011 A quiet revolution : BP190.5.H78 G66 2002 Islamic humanism / BP190.5 .W35 K434 2007 Arguing the just war in Islam / BP192.7.I68 M67 2000 The mantle of the prophet :

Includes bibliographical references (pages 307-338) and index.

The islamic resurgence and the veil: from emergence to migration. Unveiling -- The veil's vanishing past -- The 1970s : seeds of the resurgence -- The new veil : converging influences -- The 1980s : exploring women's motivations -- Islamist connections -- Migrations -- The 1990s : a changing climate in America -- After 9/11 : new pathways in America. Prologue -- Backlash : the veil, the burkah, and the clamor of war -- Isna and the women of isna -- American Muslim women's activism in the twenty-first century.

In Cairo in the 1940s, Leila Ahmed was raised by a generation of women who never dressed in the veils and headscarves their mothers and grandmothers had worn. To them, these coverings seemed irrelevant to both modern life and Islamic piety. Today, however, the majority of Muslim women throughout the Islamic world again wear the veil. Why, Ahmed asks, did this change take root so swiftly, and what does this shift mean for women, Islam, and the West? When she began her study, Ahmed assumed that the veil's return indicated a backward step for Muslim women worldwide. What she discovered, however, in the stories of British colonial officials, young Muslim feminists, Arab nationalists, pious Islamic daughters, American Muslim immigrants, violent jihadists, and peaceful Islamic activists, confounded her expectations. Ahmed observed that Islamism, with its commitments to activism in the service of the poor and in pursuit of social justice, is the strain of Islam most easily and naturally merging with western democracies' own tradition of activism in the cause of justice and social change. It is often Islamists, even more than secular Muslims, who are at the forefront of such contemporary activist struggles as civil rights and women's rights. Ahmed's surprising conclusions represent a near reversal of her thinking on this topic. Richly insightful, intricately drawn, and passionately argued, this absorbing story of the veil's resurgence, from Egypt through Saudi Arabia and into the West, suggests a dramatically new portrait of contemporary Islam.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Prominent feminist scholar Ahmed (Harvard) explores a subject that has reportedly puzzled her for many decades: the resurgence of Muslim head coverings in both Muslim majority societies and minority contexts. The topic has generated much public debate and countless publications, to which Ahmed adds her thoughtful perspective. Her critical historiography of "the veil" spans the 20th century, taking readers from its virtual disappearance in the 1920s to the 1950s to its reemergence with, as she argues, new and diverse meanings from the 1970s to the first decade of the 21st century. Ahmed deftly combines historical documents and existing empirical studies of veiling practices, discourses, and attitudes with her own memories, reflections, and fieldwork in the American context. Shifting the geographical focus from Egypt to the US in the latter part of the book, she argues for a close connection between veiling and the global spread of Islamism as an ideology and form of Islam. Despite her focus on Islamism as an explanatory framework, which occasionally sounds alarmist, the book's critical and self-consciously feminist perspective makes a valuable contribution to the existing literature. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. J. Hammer UNC Chapel Hill

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Leila Ahmed is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School. She is the author of Women and Gender in Islam and A Border Passage: From Cairo to America--A Woman's Journey. She lives in Cambridge, MA.</p>

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