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Women and the Texas Revolution / edited by Mary L. Scheer.

Contributor(s): Scheer, Mary L, 1949-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Denton, Tex. : University of North Texas Press, 2012Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 244 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781574414691 (cloth : alk. paper); 1574414690 (cloth : alk. paper); 9781574414592 (ebook); 1574414593 (ebook).Subject(s): Texas -- History -- Revolution, 1835-1836 -- Women | Women -- Texas -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 305.40976409/034
Contents:
Continuity, change, and removal: native women and the Texas Revolution / by Lindy Eakin -- Tejanas: Hispanic women on the losing side of the Texas Revolution / by Jean A. Stuntz -- "Joys and sorrows of those dear old times": Anglo-American women during the era of the Texas Revolution / by Mary L. Scheer -- Traveling the wrong way down freedom's trail: Black women and the Texas Revolution / by Angela Boswell -- Two silver pesos and a blanket: the Texas Revolution and the non-combatant women who survived the Battle of the Alamo / by Dora Elizondo Guerra -- "Up buck! up ball! do your duty!": women and the runaway scrape / by Light Townsend Cummins -- "To the devil with your glorious history!": women and the Battle of San Jacinto / by Jeffrey D. Dunn -- Women and the Texas Revolution in history and memory / by Laura Lyons McLemore.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F390 .W87 2012 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002146447

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Continuity, change, and removal: native women and the Texas Revolution / by Lindy Eakin -- Tejanas: Hispanic women on the losing side of the Texas Revolution / by Jean A. Stuntz -- "Joys and sorrows of those dear old times": Anglo-American women during the era of the Texas Revolution / by Mary L. Scheer -- Traveling the wrong way down freedom's trail: Black women and the Texas Revolution / by Angela Boswell -- Two silver pesos and a blanket: the Texas Revolution and the non-combatant women who survived the Battle of the Alamo / by Dora Elizondo Guerra -- "Up buck! up ball! do your duty!": women and the runaway scrape / by Light Townsend Cummins -- "To the devil with your glorious history!": women and the Battle of San Jacinto / by Jeffrey D. Dunn -- Women and the Texas Revolution in history and memory / by Laura Lyons McLemore.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Scheer (Lamar Univ.) brings together eight essays that examine the roles of and effects on Texas women in the years surrounding Texas independence (1835-1836). Collectively, these essays, according to Scheer, attempt to broaden the common interpretation of the Texas Revolution as "a manly event." Each essay explores a specific segment of women from this period, defined through ethnicity/race, such as Hispanic, African American, Anglo, or Native American women, or through their participation in events, such as the Battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto or the Runaway Scrape. Using primary and secondary sources, each essay provides both personal vignettes and academic examinations of each group, including accounts of many relatively unknown women. Overall, the anthology is clearly written and well constructed and effectively accomplishes its goal of highlighting the ways in which experiences in and around the revolution affected the lives of the many women living in Texas. Summing Up: Highly recommended. For anyone from specialists to general readers. C. L. Sinclair University of North Texas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>MARY L. SCHEER is an associate professor and chair of the history department at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas. She is also a former Fulbright Scholar to Germany. Scheer has authored The Foundations of Texan Philanthropy and co-edited with John Storey Twentieth-Century Texas: A Social and Cultural History (UNT Press). Her research interests include Texas, women, and twentieth-century social history.</p>

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