Normal view MARC view ISBD view

News of the world : poems / Philip Levine.

By: Levine, Philip, 1928-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Alfred A Knopf, 2011Edition: First paperback edition.Description: viii, 65 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780375711909 (pbk.); 0375711902 (pbk.).Uniform titles: Poems. Selections Subject(s): American poetry -- 20th century | American poetry -- 21st century
Contents:
Our valley -- Unholy Saturday -- A story -- New Year's Eve, in hospital -- Before the war -- My fathers, the Baltic -- Yakov -- Innocence -- Dearborn suite -- An extraordinary morning -- Arrival and departure -- On me! -- Blood -- Homecoming -- Of love and other disasters -- Library days -- Fixing the foot: on rhythm -- Islands -- Not worth the wait -- In the white city -- Old word -- Closed -- The language problem -- News of the world -- Alba -- The music of time -- During the war -- The death of Mayakovsky -- Two voices -- The heart of October -- Burial rites -- Magic.
Summary: A volume of prose poems and formal verses, includes pieces on breakfasting late-shift Detroit auto workers, a woman who sings with the Spanish dawn, and an Andorran communist black-market supplier.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3562.E9 N48 2011 (Browse shelf) Available

Our valley -- Unholy Saturday -- A story -- New Year's Eve, in hospital -- Before the war -- My fathers, the Baltic -- Yakov -- Innocence -- Dearborn suite -- An extraordinary morning -- Arrival and departure -- On me! -- Blood -- Homecoming -- Of love and other disasters -- Library days -- Fixing the foot: on rhythm -- Islands -- Not worth the wait -- In the white city -- Old word -- Closed -- The language problem -- News of the world -- Alba -- The music of time -- During the war -- The death of Mayakovsky -- Two voices -- The heart of October -- Burial rites -- Magic.

A volume of prose poems and formal verses, includes pieces on breakfasting late-shift Detroit auto workers, a woman who sings with the Spanish dawn, and an Andorran communist black-market supplier.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In his latest collection, prolific poet Levine ruminates on family, life, and death in the familiar colloquial style that won him the Pulitzer Prize in 1995. With a quiet intimacy, Levine quite literally delivers the news of the world, with tales of haunting mountains, exhausted Detroit workers, and Spanish songstresses. His flirtations with death in both prose poems and formal verse have a weightiness that remains long after you close the book: "I felt bad/ for the little priest: both of us/ he called 'my sons' were failing,/ slipping gracelessly from our lives/ to abandon him to face eternity/ as it came on and on and on." These poems exude a certain melancholia, but Levine's ability to examine expertly the beauty in this sadness keeps them from veering toward the unnecessarily depressing. He can paint even the strange with simple, natural language in a way that's subtly moving, and the nostalgic glow he applies to his memories makes this work the perfect addition to the oeuvre that has come to define his life. Verdict An integral part of his life's puzzle that Levine, even at 81, is still attempting to piece together; for all readers of contemporary poetry.-Jessica Roy, Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Philip Levine was born in Detroit, Michigan on January 10, 1928. Starting at the age of 14, he held a series of industrial jobs including working in a soap factory, hefting cases of soft drinks at a bottling plant, manning a punch press at Chevrolet Gear and Axle, and operating a jackhammer at Detroit Transmission. He received bachelor's and master's degrees in English from Wayne State University and a master of fine arts from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

His first collection of poetry, On the Edge, was published in 1961. His other poetry collections included 1933, Not This Pig, They Feed They Lion, A Walk with Tom Jefferson, The Mercy, and Breath. He won numerous awards during his lifetime including the 1977 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize for The Names of the Lost, the 1979 National Book Critics Circle Award for Ashes: Poems New and Old and 7 Years from Somewhere, the 1987 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize for his body of work, the National Book Award for Ashes: Poems New and Old in 1980 and for What Work Is in 1991, and a Pulitzer Prize in 1995 for The Simple Truth. He was appointed the Library of Congress 18th Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry from 2011 to 2012.

His poetry appeared in several publications including The New Yorker and Harper's Magazine. He also published a collection of autobiographical essays entitled Bread of Time and edited an anthology entitled The Essential Keats. He died of pancreatic cancer on February 14, 2015 at the age of 87.

(Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.