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Versed / Rae Armantrout.

By: Armantrout, Rae, 1947-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Wesleyan poetry: Publisher: Middletown, Conn. : Wesleyan University Press, 2010Edition: 1st Wesleyan pbk.Description: ix, 121 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780819570918 (pbk.); 0819570915.Subject(s): American poetry -- 21st centuryDDC classification: 811/.54
Contents:
Versed -- Dark matter.
Awards: Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, 2010. | National Book Critics Circle award winner, 2009. | National Book Award finalist, 2009.Summary: A collection of poetry organized in two sections. The first section, "Versed," plays with vice and versa, the perversity of human consciousness. They flirt with error and delusion, skating on a thin ice that inevitably cracks. The second section, "Dark Matter," alludes to more than the unseen substance thought to make up the majority of mass in the universe. The invisible and unknowable are confronted directly as the author's experience with cancer marks these poems with a new austerity, shot through with her signature wit and stark unsentimental thinking.--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3551.R455 V47 2010 (Browse shelf) Available

Originally published: Middletown, Conn. : Wesleyan University Press, c2009.

Versed -- Dark matter.

Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, 2010.

National Book Critics Circle award winner, 2009.

National Book Award finalist, 2009.

A collection of poetry organized in two sections. The first section, "Versed," plays with vice and versa, the perversity of human consciousness. They flirt with error and delusion, skating on a thin ice that inevitably cracks. The second section, "Dark Matter," alludes to more than the unseen substance thought to make up the majority of mass in the universe. The invisible and unknowable are confronted directly as the author's experience with cancer marks these poems with a new austerity, shot through with her signature wit and stark unsentimental thinking.--From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

What you see is what you get in Armantrout's ninth book of free-verse poetry. A professor at the University of California, San Diego, Armantrout (Next Life) was part of the West Coast poetry community of the 1970s, which gave rise to language poetry. At best, her latest work contains brief, impressionistic poems-a few words surrounded by white space-held together by a subtle tension in the connections between words and phrases. Armantrout's poems possess a fleeting light as opposed to an epiphany and a half-heard sound as opposed to rhyme and rhythm. Take, for example, the repetition in the second and final stanza of "Someone": "I'm looking for a/ heart to heart,/ a rhyme/ between the blankness of my/ "my/ and the blue emptiness." It's difficult to know whether Armantrout's sound is, say, a mouse inside the wall or a tree branch brushing the roof of the house. When these poems achieve beauty, it lies not so much in the craft as in the eyes-and ears-of the beholder. Recommended for academic libraries.-Diane Scharper, Towson Univ., MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

RAE ARMANTROUT is a professor of writing and literature at the University of California, San Diego, and the author of ten books of poetry.

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