Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The communication of hate / Michael Waltman & John Haas.

By: Waltman, Michael.
Contributor(s): Haas, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Language as social action: v. 9.Publisher: New York : Peter Lang, c2011Description: 202 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781433104473 (alk. paper); 1433104474 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Hate speech -- United States | Oral communication -- Social aspects -- United States | Freedom of speech -- United States | United States -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 364.15/6
Contents:
Language in action : overview of discursive constructs useful for understanding hate speech -- Discursive nature of organized hate groups -- Conceptual properties of hate-motivated speech -- Hate speech and the Internet -- Nativism and nativist discourse -- Nativism and the 2008 Presidential election -- Anti-hate narratives.
Summary: This book sets out to explore how hate comes alive in language and actions by examining the nature and persuasive functions of hate in American society. Hate speech may be used for many purposes and have different intended consequences. It may be directed to intimidate an out-group, or to influence the behavior of in-group members. But how does this language function? What does it accomplish? The answers to these questions are addressed by an examination of the communicative messages produced by those with hateful minds. Beginning with an examination of the organized hate movement, the book provides a critique of racist discourse used to recruit and socialize new members, construct enemies, promote valued identities, and encourage ethnoviolence. The book also examines the strategic manipulation of hatred in our everyday lives by politicians, political operatives, and media personalities. Providing a comprehensive overview of hate speech, the book ends by describing the desirable features of an anti-hate discourse that promotes respect for social differences.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
P95.54 .W35 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002149102

Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-196) and indexes.

Language in action : overview of discursive constructs useful for understanding hate speech -- Discursive nature of organized hate groups -- Conceptual properties of hate-motivated speech -- Hate speech and the Internet -- Nativism and nativist discourse -- Nativism and the 2008 Presidential election -- Anti-hate narratives.

This book sets out to explore how hate comes alive in language and actions by examining the nature and persuasive functions of hate in American society. Hate speech may be used for many purposes and have different intended consequences. It may be directed to intimidate an out-group, or to influence the behavior of in-group members. But how does this language function? What does it accomplish? The answers to these questions are addressed by an examination of the communicative messages produced by those with hateful minds. Beginning with an examination of the organized hate movement, the book provides a critique of racist discourse used to recruit and socialize new members, construct enemies, promote valued identities, and encourage ethnoviolence. The book also examines the strategic manipulation of hatred in our everyday lives by politicians, political operatives, and media personalities. Providing a comprehensive overview of hate speech, the book ends by describing the desirable features of an anti-hate discourse that promotes respect for social differences.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Books dealing with hate speech are likely to adopt one of two approaches. First Amendment absolutists are likely to see hate speech as an unfortunate but protected byproduct of free expression; diversity advocates point to a connection between hate speech and atrocious action, lamenting the fact that the US does not restrict such speech as other Western democracies do (a subject Anthony Cortese takes up in Opposing Hate Speech, CH, Sep'06, 44-0635). Waltman (Univ. of North Carolina) and Haas (Univ. of Tennessee) walk the tightrope well: though clearly opposed to hate mongers they see no call for legal remedies but rather advocate anti-hate narratives. The book is saturated with examples of hate speech (from novels, Web sites, public speeches), but the authors avoid criticism of Jessie Daniels's Cyber Racism: White Supremacy Online and the New Attack on Civil Rights (CH, Mar'10, 47-4125). In fact it is the integration of the examples that makes study so relevant and powerful for students, because they will encounter contemporary examples. Like Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic's Understanding Words that Wound (CH, Oct'04, 42-1071), this book will be useful for those who teach or are interested in communication--or any subject that touches on hate speech. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates; faculty. D. Caristi Ball State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Waltman is Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina. His research examines the social and political uses of various forms of hate speech, including the role of hate speech in the production of ethnoviolence and hate crime. Dr. Waltman and his students conduct workshops with children in North Carolina communities that focus on the value and importance of respecting social differences.<br> John Haas is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Speech Communication at the University of Tennessee. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in organizational communication, interpersonal communication, and research methods. His work has appeared in American Behavioral Scientist , Management Communication Quarterly , The Journal of Business Communication , The International Journal of Personal Construct Psychology , Southern States Communication Journal , and Journalism Quarterly .

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.